eHealthMe - Personalized health information & community eHealthMe - Personalized health information & community

Personalized health information & community

  Tools
All drugs: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
All conditions: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Check symptoms       Ask question       Write review       Answered/ Unanswered       Reviews       Community

Review: taking Vyvanse and Mirtazapine together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Vyvanse and Mirtazapine together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Vyvanse and Mirtazapine. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 43 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

 

 

 

 

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Vyvanse and Mirtazapine >>>

What are the drugs

Vyvanse has active ingredients of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. It is often used in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (latest outcomes from 7,876 Vyvanse users)

Mirtazapine has active ingredients of mirtazapine. It is often used in depression. (latest outcomes from 17,955 Mirtazapine users)

On Feb, 6, 2015: 43 people who take Vyvanse, Mirtazapine are studied

Vyvanse, Mirtazapine outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate)
- Mirtazapine (mirtazapine)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Vyvanse is effectiven/a50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 4 people)
42.86%
(3 of 7 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
Mirtazapine is effective33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
33.33%
(2 of 6 people)
n/a66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Vision BlurredDiabetes Mellitus Insulin-dependentConstipationLow TestosteroneUrticariaHivesDepressionFall
Weight GainSexual InhibitionCompulsive ShoppingDepressionHivesUrticariaFatigue
Poor Peripheral CirculationShort-term Memory LossCompulsive HoardingShort-term Memory LossDiabetes Mellitus Insulin-dependentEye Pain
Sexual InhibitionPoor Peripheral CirculationObsessive-compulsive DisorderSleep DisorderConstipationContusion
Compulsive ShoppingMood SwingsCreatine Urine AbnormalBladder Disorder
Compulsive HoardingAnxiety AggravatedHeadache
Obsessive-compulsive DisorderTeeth BrittleHypoaesthesia Facial
Lack Of Strength, Muscle Weakness, WeaknessLack Of Strength, Muscle Weakness, WeaknessPain
Mood SwingsVision BlurredSinusitis
DystoniaWeight GainNasopharyngitis

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Vyvanse is effective27.27%
(3 of 11 people)
60.00%
(6 of 10 people)
Mirtazapine is effective11.11%
(1 of 9 people)
36.36%
(4 of 11 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
FallImpulsive Behaviour
HeadacheInjection Site Swelling
Hypoaesthesia FacialInjection Site Pain
Mobility DecreasedAccidental Exposure
Eye PainOverdose
Conversion DisorderWeight Increased
Adverse Drug ReactionHallucination, Visual
Bladder DisorderAggression
ContusionSedation
Multiple Sclerosis RelapseVomiting

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Vyvanse is effectiven/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
14.29%
(3 of 21 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
Mirtazapine is effectiven/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
14.29%
(1 of 7 people)
5.00%
(1 of 20 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/aWeight IncreasedHallucinationDepressionHypokalaemiaMobility DecreasedLow TestosteroneVomiting
OverdoseHeart Rate IncreasedConstipationManiaHeadacheNausea
SedationConvulsionCreatine Urine AbnormalTachycardiaMultiple Sclerosis RelapseBlood Pressure Decreased
AggressionDrug AbuseObsessive-compulsive DisorderBlood Pressure IncreasedNasopharyngitisAbdominal Pain
Hallucination, VisualOverdoseCompulsive ShoppingHivesSinusitis
Impulsive BehaviourGranulocytopeniaCompulsive HoardingShort-term Memory LossPain
Poor Quality SleepLeukopeniaSexual InhibitionUrticariaFatigue
DyspnoeaDependencePoor Peripheral CirculationSleep DisorderHypoaesthesia Facial
DystoniaAccidental ExposureMood SwingsFall
ManiaInjection Site PainAnxiety AggravatedAdverse Drug Reaction

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Vyvanse and Mirtazapine?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Vyvanse and Mirtazapine
- support group for people who take Mirtazapine
- support group for people who take Vyvanse

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Mirtazapine, Vyvanse

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Caution about remeron!
    As do many folks suffering from fibromyalgia with depression I ended up seeing a psychiatrist; several actually over the years. During my clinical exams in nursing school my anxiety levels were unbearable and my doc changed my AD to Remeron. So what happened? No more anxiety - no emotions at all! My daughter declared, "You're not my mom anymore - I don't know who you are!" I was walking into walls, my eye/hand coordination went wonky, and I didn't care! The only feeling I had was hunger. I gained THIRTY POUNDS IN ONE MONTH! Not trusting my shrink anymore because prescribing this potent drug to a nursing student was beyond negligent I went to my GP for advice. She was shocked and told me she only prescribed Remeron for her endstage cancer patients, mainly to increase their appetite. I was switched to another AD and sailed through my clinical and state board exams.

    Even though we feel powerless and vulnerable when in crisis we have to garner enough energy to get all the facts and question if the medication is really the right choice!
  • Longterm vyvanse use and myocarditis
    At 19 years old, I suddenly had a heart attack out of no where that left me with chronic myocarditis and pericarditis. I was perfectly healthy, did not use drugs, ate well, and exercised daily. The doctors could not come up with any explanation, but assumed it was an autoimmune disease. Neither heart disease nor autoimmune disease run in my family and the rheumatologist could not find any abnormalities. The only thing that I can come to think that caused this disease for me is taking vyvanse for about 5 years. Since then I have refused to take it, and it took me over a year for my heart to all most fully recover(it will never be fully recovered). I just want to know if there is anyone else out there who have suffered from a similar situation as me.
  • The zoloft/vyvanse concoction ruined my life.
    I started taking these drugs about two months ago. I am diagnosed ADHD by a psychiatrist. I received these medications from a doctor whom I know and is married to a friend my wife. She, the doctor, gave them to me from her personal medications in a plastic baggy. I was given loose instructions for taking these on a piece of paper. I was never given the paperwork with warning signs. 10 days after starting these medications, I attacked my wife and am now separated. I am barred from seeing her and my daughter by means of a Victims Protective Order. I am a normally nonviolent person. Most who know me call me a peacemaker...a pacifist. I am still horrified by the events of that night. 15 seconds changed my life forever. I hope and pray my story helps others. Don't be naïve, as I was, when given medications. Ask questions.
  • Transition from mirtazapine to cymbalta (bipolar ii) 6 week duration taken in conjunction with seroquel, propranalol and implanon
    In early September I approached my Psychiatrist to report that I was having sleep paralysis episodes as well as insatiable appetite. I had put on about 20lb in the space of 6 months since the sleep paralysis started.

    My Psychiatrist opted to wean me off the Mirtazapine and onto Cymbalta. I have now been on 60mg of Cymbalta for about 4 weeks and completely titrated off the Mirtazapine.

    I have noted that since switching to Cymbalta that I no longer have the insatiable appetite, nor have I had any further sleep paralysis episodes (though I have had a brain MRI to rule out any physiological issues - yet to receive results).

    I have noticed that I have had mild to moderate rolling nausea with the Cymbalta and that I now have food aversions. Food does not interest me as much anymore and I find that certain foods (mostly processed snacks) are no longer palatable. I also find that I become full after much smaller meal portions.

    I have found that I can no longer drink wine or spirits because they now taste awful however I can still tolerate certain brands of beer. I also no longer enjoy drinking cola.

    I am also on the Implanon Implant. I have had this implant inserted for about 12 months and my cycles have been rather regular. Since starting the Cymbalta I have had some breakthrough bleeding yet my periods have not been as painful, though they have been heavier and longer.

    My Psychiatrist will commence titrating me off the Seroquel in about two weeks and onto Topamax as it is his belief it will be less sedating than the Seroquel and that it will hopefully help as a mood stabiliser, treat my migraines and allow me to come off the Propranolol. he also hopes that I am able to loose some of the weight gained since the sleep paralysis episodes started.

    As a side note regarding the Propranolol, I have naturally low blood pressure and I find while Propranalol is generally an effective migraine prophylactic, (I do get some breakthrough migraines) it does make my blood pressure even lower which leads to dizziness and faintness when I stand up too quickly from a recumbent position.
  • Patients having false positives while on remeron
    I have had a few patients complain they are failing drug tests for Amphetamines while on remeron, and have claimed to have not used any type of Amphetamine or any (Mixed Salts). These patients are all or were on probation, parole, or under some stipulation. Iv realized most of these patients are taking another psych med. The list consists of insomnia meds such as Ambien(zolpidem), Sonata(zaleplon),Lunesta(eszopiclone). Also the Anti-Depressants Lexapro (escitalopram)and Prozac (fluoxetine). One of my patients was on Diazepam (Valium). I have switched medicines, particularly the Ambien, Lexapro, and Prozac have reversed the false negative. I prescribe many of my patients remeron. I'm a big believer in its effects on my patients moods and everyday depression. I have heard this happening before, but this was the first time I have ever had this happen to one of my own patients.(These were 5 separate patients in the span of 16 months) Of course none of these patients were criminalized based on lab results, but the issue still lies there. I know this is common for a lot of script meds to give false positives for narcotics. This is just obviously one I am putting out there. Let me know if anyone has experienced something similar.

More reviews for: Mirtazapine, Vyvanse

Comments from related studies:

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) is often used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Mirtazapine (mirtazapine) is often used to treat depression. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

   

About - Terms of service - Privacy policy - Press - Testimonials - Contact us

 
© 2015 eHealthMe.com. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of eHealthMe.com's terms of service and privacy policy.