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Review: taking Suboxone and Prednisone together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Suboxone and Prednisone together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Prednisone. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 60 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

 

 

 

 

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Suboxone and Prednisone >>>

What are the drugs

Suboxone has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal. (latest outcomes from 8,278 Suboxone users)

Prednisone has active ingredients of prednisone. It is often used in rheumatoid arthritis. (latest outcomes from 150,083 Prednisone users)

On Jan, 27, 2015: 60 people who take Suboxone, Prednisone are studied

Suboxone, Prednisone outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Prednisone (prednisone)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a
Prednisone is effectiven/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
AbasiaCellulitisGrand Mal Seizuren/aSuicide Attemptn/an/aCellulitis
AphasiaFeeling JitteryBlurred VisionHomicidal IdeationArthralgia
Psychomotor Skills ImpairedDyspnoeaRinging In The EarsPanic AttackMigraine
Cardiac ArrestJoint DislocationCongenital AfibrinogenemiaPost-traumatic Stress DisorderSwelling
Pleuritic PainPneumoniaAnxietyAlopecia
FibromyalgiaVomitingMajor DepressionInfluenza
OverdoseAbdominal PainRinging In The EarsDepression
CellulitisLimb InjuryBlurred VisionSpinal Osteoarthritis
ArthralgiaHidradenitisGrand Mal SeizureGeneral Physical Health Deterioration
AsthmaLower Respiratory Tract InfectionCongenital AfibrinogenemiaIntervertebral Disc Protrusion

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
Prednisone is effective0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
CellulitisHeart Rate
ArthralgiaPain
MigraineRecurring Skin Boils
InfluenzaTooth Abscess
SwellingInjection Site Pain
DepressionDyspnoea
Spinal OsteoarthritisNausea
AlopeciaPsychotic Disorder
General Physical Health DeteriorationSubstance-induced Psychotic Disorder
Intervertebral Disc ProtrusionToothache

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/an/a25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a
Prednisone is effectiven/an/an/a25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/an/aMalaiseAbdominal PainMucosal InflammationCellulitisn/a
Lactic AcidosisCellulitisNon-hodgkin's LymphomaDyspnoea
Diabetes MellitusHidradenitisMigraineVomiting
Mouth UlcerationSwellingLymphoedemaJoint Dislocation
Gastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseNauseaPain In JawFeeling Jittery
Drug IneffectiveVomitingPneumonia StaphylococcalLimb Injury
Memory ImpairmentGingival SwellingSpinal OsteoarthritisPneumonia
Bipolar DisorderAmnesiaSwellingHaematemesis
Head InjuryWeight Bearing DifficultySpinal Cord CompressionLower Respiratory Tract Infection
Pain In ExtremityTardive DyskinesiaSinusitisDiarrhoea

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Suboxone and Prednisone?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Suboxone and Prednisone
- support group for people who take Prednisone
- support group for people who take Suboxone

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Prednisone, Suboxone

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Adverse reaction to prednisone
    Severe allergic reaction. Given prednisone for angioedema attributed to Lisinopril. Within 24 hours, severe red skin on face, bp +200/+100 spikes, shortness of breath, chest pain snd severe heart palpitations. Went to ER. Given another IV cocktail of sulomedrol, Bdnadryl snd Zantac, told to double my prednisone pills to 20 mg twice a day. On fifth day, znother similar reaction but worse. Went in ambulance to ER. Put on oxygen and atavan. Sent home with six day tapering dose. No appetite. Nausea. After last pill, blood pressure spikes, flushing, chills, fatigue, blood sugar crashes, especially at night. Had to eat every two hours. Severe skin pain and itching, going on still after six weeks of stopping meds. This drug has HORRIBLE side effects. None of the drs czn tell me how long this will last, or evdn if it will go away. Eating organic, taking soothing baths, detoxing, taking adrenal, vitamin and mineral suppldments, drinking water and detoxing teas. Some symptoms are a bit better but skin is driving me crazy. How czn this drug be prescribed when drs really don 't know all it does nor how to counteract the horrible side effects!?!?
  • Ears thundering after suboxone or any opiate
    Anyone notice the thundering in your ears after taking suboxone. Larger doses mostly and it actually happens with any opiate. It's a rumbling in the ears, I did read that hearing loss and opiates were connnected. hmmm
  • My finger tendons broke on prednisone
    Twelve years ago I was put on prednisone for sudden hearing loss. The prednisone helped the hearing loss (for as long as I took the drug; hearing loss returned after I stopped the prednisone.) But I kept getting ruptured tendons in my fingers, which I had to splint to use. I couldn't figure out why in heck this was happening. My doctor(s) didn't have a clue. I suspected the ruptures might have to do with prednisone. Now I know they were caused by it. When I stopped the prednisone, the tendon-ruptures stopped, too. This should be Must Tell information for any doctor who prescribes this dangerous drug.
  • Ulcerative colitis from suboxone?
    Anyone else out there experiencing ulcerative colitis after multiple yearprescribed Suboxone? Suboxone stole a large portion of my life, and now I am considering going on a full-agonist analgesic until the buprenorphine bond has broken, and no more presence of it in my plasma. Insane!
  • Suboxone treatment may have caused my trichotillomania
    It's a long story of how I became addicted to opiates after 15+ years of chronic pain, but I decided to give up pain killers and try suboxone/subutex treatment. Shortly thereafter, I began pulling hair. First from my head, then when the bald spots became too obvious I started pulling from all over. It seemed to be triggered by stress or anxiety but not always. I did not make an association until recently, when I finally stopped the suboxone. It was two weeks of miserable withdrawal, much worse than from pain killers themselves, but I am finally out of the haze I'd be in all of that time, and I have no urge to pull hair whatsoever. I don't know how often the association of suboxone use and trichotillomania has been examined, but I wanted to share my experience in case anyone else is in a similar situation. Also, if you are considering starting suboxone treatment, don't. Withdrawal from opiates will lead to a few pretty rough days, but that's nothing compared to what you'll go through during suboxone withdrawal.

More reviews for: Prednisone, Suboxone

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (1 year ago):

  • Took Suboxone to get off fifteen year oxycontin med for lower back pain, my whole body swelled, for over a month, severe rash, trapped air in lungs, high blood pressure, eight months later I can't sit back or put any pressure on upper back, get sick to stomach and waves of sick tingles thru body and arms, plus my back is still swelled.

    Reply

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Prednisone (prednisone) is often used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

   

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