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Review: Dilaudid and Percocet





Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Dilaudid and Percocet together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Dilaudid and Percocet. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 1,470 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Dilaudid and Percocet >>>

What are the drugs

Dilaudid has active ingredients of hydromorphone hydrochloride. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from Dilaudid 10,263 users)

Percocet has active ingredients of acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from Percocet 26,450 users)

On Nov, 28, 2014: 1,470 people who take Dilaudid, Percocet are studied

Dilaudid, Percocet outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Dilaudid (hydromorphone hydrochloride)
- Percocet (acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Dilaudid is effective30.77%
(4 of 13 people)
66.67%
(6 of 9 people)
33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a
Percocet is effective8.33%
(1 of 12 people)
33.33%
(2 of 6 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
n/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Haemoglobin DecreasedDrug DependenceDrug DependenceDrug DependenceDepressionHallucination, Auditoryn/aPain
AnxietyDepressionHepatic NecrosisCoeliac Artery Compression SyndromeDrug DependenceAgitationAnxiety
ArthralgiaDysarthriaConstipationConstipationAggressionHostilityBack Pain
Haematocrit DecreasedTooth AbscessCoeliac Artery Compression SyndromeHepatic NecrosisIntentional OverdoseAggressionOsteonecrosis Of Jaw
White Blood Cell Count IncreasedDental CariesAcute Respiratory Distress SyndromeAcute Respiratory Distress SyndromeAnxietyBorderline Personality DisorderNausea
Abdominal PainAbnormal BehaviourPneumoniaPneumoniaSuicide AttemptAngerArthralgia
VasculitisPainWithdrawal SyndromeWithdrawal SyndromeAbscess OralPost-traumatic Stress DisorderInjury
Umbilical Cord AbnormalityDrug IneffectiveDysarthriaDeep Vein ThrombosisDental CariesHomicidal IdeationAnaemia
Alanine Aminotransferase IncreasedPneumoniaDrug Withdrawal SyndromeDepressionPersonality ChangeDepressionFatigue
PhlebitisDrug AbuseTooth AbscessDental CariesTooth LossBipolar DisorderVomiting

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Dilaudid is effective50.00%
(10 of 20 people)
25.00%
(2 of 8 people)
Percocet is effective35.00%
(7 of 20 people)
0.00%
(0 of 8 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
PainPain
AnxietyAnxiety
NauseaBack Pain
Osteonecrosis Of JawArthralgia
Back PainOsteonecrosis Of Jaw
AnaemiaNausea
VomitingInjury
Oedema PeripheralPyrexia
FatigueFatigue
Pain In ExtremityOsteomyelitis

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Dilaudid is effectiven/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
27.27%
(3 of 11 people)
21.43%
(3 of 14 people)
33.33%
(3 of 9 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
Percocet is effectiven/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
18.18%
(2 of 11 people)
6.67%
(1 of 15 people)
22.22%
(2 of 9 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
20.00%
(1 of 5 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Systemic Lupus Erythematosusn/aPainAnxietyPainPainPainPain
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusVomitingAbdominal Pain UpperNauseaAnxietyAnxietyAnxiety
Suicide AttemptCholelithiasisVomitingAbdominal PainNauseaOsteonecrosis Of JawFall
Pulmonary EmbolismAnxietyInjuryIntervertebral Disc ProtrusionArthralgiaOedema PeripheralBack Pain
Neuroleptic Malignant SyndromePulmonary EmbolismCholecystitisArthralgiaDyspnoeaBack PainInjury
Deep Vein ThrombosisEmotional DistressHeadacheAnxietyBack PainAnaemiaPneumonia
Abdominal Pain UpperCholecystitis ChronicIntervertebral Disc DegenerationDepressionHypoaesthesiaOsteomyelitis
DyspnoeaUrinary Tract InfectionBack PainOsteonecrosis Of JawFatigueOsteonecrosis Of Jaw
CholecystitisNauseaOsteonecrosis Of JawChest PainEmotional DistressBone Disorder
InjuryPainPulmonary EmbolismPyrexiaOsteoarthritisAnaemia

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Dilaudid and Percocet?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Dilaudid and Percocet
- support group for people who take Dilaudid
- support group for people who take Percocet

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Dilaudid, Percocet

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Percocet and memory loss
    A close friend of mine has been using prescription Percocet for 5 to 6 years. Her MD first prescribed the lowest dosage possible to be taken 3 to 4 times daily for pain. I am aware that this medication frequently needs to be increased because it will become less effective. I don't know how many times he has increased the dosage but it has been many times. I believe now she is taking the highest dosage of it up to four to six times daily and six tablets at a time. I have made several attempts to tell her the information I know about Percocet and to have her to ask her MD about her now short and long term memory problems. Her response is to shout at me, telling me she needs that much for pain and to mind my own business when I tell her about the negative side effects I see, especially her daily and hourly memory problems. She has also said she has no reason to speak to her doctor about memory problems. I think that is because she fears he might lower the dosage. My concern about her poor memory only causes her to tell me I am the one with a bad memory, even though the only pain meds I infrequently take are OTC ones. According to my MD, I have been told my memory for my age of 63 is perfectly fine and better than most for my age. Also I take no medications with the side effects that cause memory problems. In addition when my MD prescribes new medication I always read the info that accompanies them, do research online and pay attention to all warnings and side effect info. The few times I have had side effects they have only been GI problems and I have consulted my MD regarding those and work with my MD for an alternative medication. My friend NEVER EVER reads any of the accompanying material that comes with her prescriptions. Also she never looks up her medications online to get additional information, including possible side effects. I worry about her very much and fear she now has an addiction to Percocet. Several years ago she asked her MD for Chantix to stop smoking, never reading the info supplied with the prescription. I urged to read the info and side effects. She declined, telling me she knew what she was doing. After two weeks of using Chantix she had a mental break down and ended up on the psych ward of our local hospital for 3 weeks. That medication was the first that began to cause her to have memory problems. She accepted that fact for about a month then dismissed it claiming her memory problems were over. They weren't because she was still taking Percocet. I understand no one wants to be told by a friend they suspect that person has memory problems, but I haven't done so to be mean or cruel, but only out of great love and concern. At this point with all the Percocet she takes daily she really is at a level to be considered an addict and I fear soon she will convince her MD to increase the dosage because it no longer controls her pain. I've written this review as a cautionary tale to inform others to be vigilant with their family, friends and loved ones as Percocet can and does cause short and long term memory loss. Although all my efforts to assist and speak to my friend have failed, please don't give up on those in your life who you notice are experiencing memory loss signs that take Percocet. If possible speak to them or their MD. Oh, and be prepared to be yelled at that you are the one with memory problems or to be told to mind your own business. And please, please read the information that accompanies all of your medications.
  • Sepsis hallucinations misdiagnosed
    I was admitted to the hospital at 10 p.m., with a total bowel blockage caused by scar-tissue adhesions. I had first gone to the ER at 3 a.m. that morning, but the ER doc misdiagnosed my condition as constipation. I was in extreme pain and also too weak to tell my husband when he first came home that I needed to return to the ER. By the time I returned, I became violently nauseated, and vomited repeatedly. Then a gastro-nasal tube was forced down my nose and into my stomach. I began hallucinating at approximately 5 p.m. the following day. I did not realize I was hallucinating, and thought my experiences were real. Some were quite coherent, such as believing there was a book sitting on table at home with a photo on the front showing a sculpture in white marble of a woman's hands holding the Bible, with barbed wire wrapped around her hands. I thought the sculpture had won the Nobel prize, and the book was the biography of the sculptor, whose mother had gone to extraordinary lengths to keep him safe from the Nazis. Some may actually have occurred during dreams, and were wildly improbable, but I don't recall ever going to sleep. At one point, I thought I was at a rest stop on the NJ turnpike, and saw the Nobel-winning sculptor there, working on a wood sculpture. The sculptor turned out to be the maintenance man on the hospital floor. I pulled out the naso-gastral tube three times, but was unaware that I had done so, although I do remember believing that I was buried beneath peat moss and feeling suffocated as I clawed my way out. I also thought I was at a party being given by a law firm which had sold its building to a school for gifted children, but I (also a lawyer) had been deposited there by my nurse and her boyfriend, who were supposed to have taken me to the OR. Some scenes from a book I had been reading made their way into my delusions, which were so real to me that I actually called some of the people involved later on and asked if the events had really happened. The hallucinations began before surgery and continued afterward. When I awoke from anesthesia, I thought the hospital staff was painting the doors to my upstairs bathroom, a project I'd been involved with before the blockage struck. I asked them how they knew what colors to use. They thought I was joking, and confirmed that they had gotten the colors right. Finally a neurologist was summoned, and I told her I was on the passenger ramp at La Guardia airport (instead of in a hospital in NC), and that I'd been born in Havana, Cuba (instead of Baltimore, MD.) I believed myself to be a member of the ruling party in Cuba (pre-Castro) and during an outdoor ceremony, an earthquake had struck, causing ancient monuments to come tumbling down. Later, I was bobbing in harbor waters near a huge ocean liner, with plastic bottles and other detritus floating by. The foregoing are only a small sample of the multitude of hallucinations. Occasionally, I was only an observer of astonishing events, but usually I was a participant. I recognized my husband and friends, but told them about many of these events, believing they had happened. The neurologist diagnosed clonazepam withdrawal. My other doctors later said this was unlikely, as I took clonazepam in small amounts on an erratic schedule, and was not dependent on the drug, although my prescription called for 3 mg. daily. Physician friends said my symptoms were more likely the result of sepsis. I did contract a urinary-tract infection from the catheter, and was being given antibiotics. Additionally, the nature of my underlying condition, and the delay in diagnosis and treatment, may have contributed to the sepsis. Hallucinations occur in only a very small percentage of sepsis sufferers, and in only a small percentage of those withdrawing suddenly from clonazepam. However, I do fit the profile of those who do experience hallucinations with sepsis, being female and aged 62 at the time of this description. After the three-day period, I returned to normal, although believing that my hallucinations had been real persisted for some days afterward. I recovered quickly from the surgery, although the pain persisted for a while, and I was walking easily (dragging my IV with me) through the hospital halls. This was the ONLY symptom I had. Not all the hallucinations were unpleasant -- in fact, they were highly interesting -- but they were incredibly complex. I still remember all the details, better than I remember what actually happened yesterday. Except for the urinary-tract infection, I had no other adverse effects from hospitalization -- no fever, chills, nausea, sweating, headaches, trembling or anything of that kind. The bowel blockage and the surgery were of course not fun, but in a way the hallucinations were fascinating. My own feeling, and that of the doctors who know me and my medical issues, is that my experiences were caused by sepsis, not clonazepam withdrawal, and the antibiotics I was given are probably what saved me.
  • Why does my urine smell bad?
    urine has very strong fowel odor. smells like rotting meat. very concentrated and cloudy and dark color.
  • Which issue has caused my periodontitis, my fibromyalgia or spinal stenosis? (2 responses)
    At the age of 38 yrs old, I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Spinal Stenosis. Obviously I had both of the disease for some years, and was struggling with the pain and symptoms for some time before I finally got checked, went through years being told they didn't find anything, told I had Herniated disks in My back only. Now with all the findings, there are 7 Herniated disks from My neck to My lower back.
    Also since 2010, I was diagnosed with Periodontitis and have been losing all of My teeth in the top of My mouth.
    I am 44 yrs old now, have been on disability for the last 4 years. I am down to 6 teeth in the top of My mouth, since having 1 removed just last week. They are telling Me that 3 more need to come out, and I am trying not to sink into total depression, especially since these are now My front teeth. I have a appointment today for a Denture Exam.

    I started researching today to see if this Periodontitis is related to either My Spinal Stenosis or My Fibromyalgia. Especially since I once again looked up the definition for Periodontitis. Which States;

    **Periodontal Disease and Bone Health. Periodontitis is a chronic infection that affects the gums and the bones that support the teeth. Bacteria and the body's own immune system break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place.

    Of course with My disease of Spinal Stenosis and the bone loss as well as the nerve narrowing, I thought the breaking down of the bone in the gums might have a connection. Research didnt find any linking.

    Now with Fibromyalgia, research showed 6 out of 17 thousand that they found. LOL Wow.. Well I guess I am "Number 7". Lucky Me! But it does make more sense now that looking at the definition. It is a Chronic infection (which Fibromyalia does create these) that effects the gums and bones. Bacteria and The Body's own Immune System break down the bone and connective tissue that hold the teeth. Which with Fibromyalgia, our Immune System is always all kinds of "Crazy"!

    Oh course you can not have any of these diseases, or any other health issues and wind up with Periodontitis. It happens. But I know from lots of reading, researching and living with Fibromyalgia, that it is "Very Possible"!

    I would sure like to know what others with these 2 diseases are experiencing.
    Have a Blessed Day.
  • Eczema and birth control-microgestin
    I started getting eczema over the last year and recently decided it may be from the birth control as well, which I started taking @ 2 months before I got the eczema and skin started breaking out...weight gain, etc. I am on singulair, westcort cream, moisture/kenalog, exederm cream, cerevue wash, cetaphil moisturizer, and started using the black soap which is apparently helping. I started a vegetarian diet and eat mainly the same foods daily to monitor anything for allergies. I stopped taking the pill 3 days ago and I am optimistic. I am hoping others have had positive experiences.

More reviews for: Dilaudid, Percocet

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (1 year ago):

  • One week ago had cervical fusion of C5-C6. Severe muscle pain started two days ago. Went to the emergency room and normal labs and normal urinalysis. Pain is all in my lower half. Starts in my pelvic floor and coccyx and extends to my ankles. Lower back, knees, groin, and calf muscles are severe.

    Reply

  • From this study (2 years ago):

  • I was in a car accident in 2000. My lower back was trashed, and had to be reconstructed basically. I have fusions and titanium, all of this as causd many other health problems to arise over the last 10 years. But, I live a pretty normal life, most people don't even know there is anything wrong with me. : )

    Ultracet and Ultram, any drug from that family can be very dangerous, I had a serious reaction with Ultracet. I had 3 seizures before we figured out what was happening to me.

    Solu-Medrol was used in the hospital through my IV, for a complicated migraine problem. I do not know if I had some kind of allergic reaction to it, or if that drug just does that to people, but, I was ripping the IV out of my arm! I couldn't stand it! It felt like fire ants were under every inch of my skin crawling and biting me all the way down and back up my arms and legs! It took hours to stop, and it did not help the migraine either.

    Reply

    Allergic... on Mar, 6, 2013:

    allergic reaction to vancomycin and sulfamethoxazole....
    I was given vancomycin through an iv 2 days ago. Today I decided to take some sulfamethoxazole and the allergic reaction is unbearable. It's been 4 hrs and the burning aching hasn't stopped. How did u manage to stop the allergic reaction. I'm wondering if I should wait it out or go into er.

    Reply

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Dilaudid (hydromorphone hydrochloride) is often used to treat pain. Percocet (acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride) is often used to treat pain. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

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