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Review: Gravol and Zopiclone





Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Gravol and Zopiclone together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Gravol and Zopiclone. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 57 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Gravol and Zopiclone >>>

What are the drugs

Gravol has active ingredients of dimenhydrinate. It is often used in nausea. (latest outcomes from Gravol 915 users)

Zopiclone has active ingredients of eszopiclone. It is often used in insomnia. (latest outcomes from Zopiclone 7,090 users)

On Nov, 24, 2014: 57 people who take Gravol, Zopiclone are studied

Gravol, Zopiclone outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Gravol (dimenhydrinate)
- Zopiclone (eszopiclone)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Gravol is effective100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a
Zopiclone is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Dysgeusian/aDry SkinVertigo PositionalBlood Alkaline Phosphatase IncreasedLong-term Memory LossTired EyesMobility Decreased
Cerebrovascular AccidentPain - MusclesVertigo PositionalFearPain - MusclesUrinary Tract Infection
Tired EyesParanoiaDry SkinFall
Blood Alkaline Phosphatase IncreasedSense Of OppressionBack Pain
Long-term Memory LossHallucination, AuditoryNausea
Sense Of OppressionAsthenia
ParanoiaConvulsion
FearMalaise
Hallucination, AuditoryTremor
Abdominal Pain

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Gravol is effective28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
Zopiclone is effective14.29%
(1 of 7 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
Back PainConvulsion
Urinary Tract InfectionMalaise
AstheniaHypotension
Chest PainProcedural Nausea
Swelling FaceLoss Of Proprioception
NauseaMultiple Sclerosis
Mobility DecreasedRestless Legs Syndrome
Peripheral Motor NeuropathyMuscle Rupture
Condition AggravatedBalance Disorder
Renal Failure AcuteParaesthesia

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Gravol is effectiven/an/an/a66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 5 people)
0.00%
(0 of 6 people)
n/a
Zopiclone is effectiven/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 5 people)
16.67%
(1 of 6 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/an/aSwelling FaceApplication Site ExfoliationDysgeusiaProstatic Specific Antigen IncreasedAsthenia
Mobility DecreasedNauseaIntraocular Pressure IncreasedBalance DisorderBack Pain
ArthralgiaPoor Venous AccessPneumoniaParaesthesiaAbdominal Pain
Joint SwellingApplication Site PruritusTired EyesJoint InjuryAnxiety
SyncopeApplication Site OdourDry SkinUrosepsisPallor
Swelling FacePain - MusclesDemyelinationNausea
UrticariaVertigo PositionalCarpal Tunnel SyndromeChest Pain
Muscular WeaknessAtaxiaAcquired Porphyria
Motor DysfunctionEnterococcal InfectionPalpitations
Blood Test AbnormalMuscle RuptureCondition Aggravated

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Gravol and Zopiclone?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Gravol and Zopiclone
- support group for people who take Gravol
- support group for people who take Zopiclone

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

  • Is it safe to take demerol while taking tramadol hydrochloride and hydroxychloroquine
    I am experiencing acute, debilitating pain due to the Chikungunya virus, which has reintroduced all of the previous painful symptoms I have,ongoing and in the past, from Fibromyalgia, Arthritis, tendonitis and severe headaches. It's in its 38th day and I am basically crippled from neck to feet. Have to sleep propped up as arms throb with pain when horizontal. The only thing that has subdued the pain slightly are Oxycocet and Ibuprofen, but the pain never goes away. My hands and feet are so inflammed it's difficult to perform even the smallest tasks of personal hygiene and housekeeping. I have difficulty controlling my bladder and often don't make it to the washroom in time. Just started on Demerol today so will no longer take the Oxycocet, but am concerned of the interactions with Demerol, Hydroxychloroquine and Tramadol Hydrochloride extended release tablets that I take daily for the Fibromyalgia and Arthritis. I have dealt with a great deal of pain through the years, but I now have the pain of every serious illness I have had in my lifetime, all at the same time. I honestly didn't think a person could deal with this much pain at once. I have tried and am still taking several vitamins and herbal supplements as well as drinking tons of water and eating really well. Lots of berries, dark vegetables, apples, yogurt and minimal meat. Taking turmeric, papaya leaf, ginger, cinnamon and boswellia for the inflammation. Taking minimal wheat products, sugar and no alcohol. Also, drinking green, fennel and nettle tea daily. I know this is a lot of information, but I really need help and wonder if anyone has any suggestions! Thanking you in advance!!!
  • Propranolo & pregabalin - do they produce heart troubles? my meds mix has
    Being on zopiclone 75mg (sleep med) gave me terrible poly/firbomyalgia, which I was then prescrbed pregabalin to aleviate pains and anxiety, and the propranolo to help with the same. On day one of propranolo I had a medium heart attack like event, within 24hrs had a large attack and became hospitalised. But vital signs and chest xray, blood tests, then showed 'normal'. But since then have had several more (almost one or more a month) heart attacklike events, hospitalisation, etc, but still being told all 'normal'. But now I've met someone who has told me they had similar heart issues and were told professionally for years his vital signs were normal : he now has a tripple-heart-bypass. I keep being told the angina like symtoms I have are anxiety realted - "only". But when I look at the professional descriptions and illustrations of angina, and similar, I see I could have written and drawn those from my own experiences. Hellish! No where to turn to. So I'm stopping the meds now one by one in careful withdrawl - docs don't like it - but I'm convinced my meds are slowly degrading my overall health as they build up into a toxic soup in me. I started this withdrawly after I discovered that - officially - Pregabalin (a calcium ?minimiser) and Propranolol (a beta blocker) should not be taken together in case they cause heart malfunctions... shame my doctors didn't know that.... before they let me take them for 8 months!!!!!!
  • Can amphotericin make nexavar less effective?
    Our son failed to achieve remission after the inducation and then subsequent consolidation phases of treatment for AML The second attempt failed as well. Since then he began to take Nexavar 200mg X 2 BID for the flt3 gene mutation and experienced dramatic results immediately. Blasts cells dropped to less than .1 from 40% and white blood cells from over 50 to .3. At the same time that he began this drug though he also began to take Amphotericin for a fungal infection in his lungs. At present, two weeks later, we are starting to see a gradual increase in his wbc level as well as the blast cells (.2 to .6 levels) again. Hence the question over whether the Amphotericin is affecting the effectiveness of the Nexavar.
  • What could be causing eye pain and headacne and bright glaring light on the right side only?
    Senitive to light, can't spend long on computer or cell phone. Diagnosed with anklylosing spondylosis
  • Does gravol leave a sick sweet taste in your mouth?
    I just had an appendectomy and am on percocet and gravol. I have this disgusting sweet taste in my mouth that I can not get rid of with brushing my teeth and I'd like to know if this is a side effect of either of these drugs

More questions for: Gravol, Zopiclone

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Patients having false positives while on remeron
    I have had a few patients complain they are failing drug tests for Amphetamines while on remeron, and have claimed to have not used any type of Amphetamine or any (Mixed Salts). These patients are all or were on probation, parole, or under some stipulation. Iv realized most of these patients are taking another psych med. The list consists of insomnia meds such as Ambien(zolpidem), Sonata(zaleplon),Lunesta(eszopiclone). Also the Anti-Depressants Lexapro (escitalopram)and Prozac (fluoxetine). One of my patients was on Diazepam (Valium). I have switched medicines, particularly the Ambien, Lexapro, and Prozac have reversed the false negative. I prescribe many of my patients remeron. I'm a big believer in its effects on my patients moods and everyday depression. I have heard this happening before, but this was the first time I have ever had this happen to one of my own patients.(These were 5 separate patients in the span of 16 months) Of course none of these patients were criminalized based on lab results, but the issue still lies there. I know this is common for a lot of script meds to give false positives for narcotics. This is just obviously one I am putting out there. Let me know if anyone has experienced something similar.
  • Michael my son died as a result of kolopin & ambien (5 responses)
    My beautiful son to whom I depended upon took his Life by suicide on July 16, 2013. He had been struggling with a sleep disorder. It seemed to begin in his last year of high school 2010. Mike was very strong in mind and in body. He became a certified personal trainer. He encouraged everyone around him and all of his clients. How can someone so strong be so weak?
    He had been heavily medicated by a sleep doctor, for years this doctor gave him different medicines and he began to show other heath impairments..I could not see so many things that are very clear to me now, I never saw the effect the drugs had on him. he was growing more tired and withdrawn. He knew so much about medicines that I thought he knew what was happening he and I both trusted the doctors. With each new problem that occurred there was always a new drug to try and along with it a new set of side effects. A new doctor was added to his care and this doctor right away gave an RX for Kolopin. He was already taking Ambien and the two dont seem to play well together. Mean while he was growing sicker and sicker. We constantly were going for this test or that test, never once did the sleep doctor ever think that the drugs being given were the cause of all of his distress.
    At one point he was unable to keep food down and was throwing up every day. More test that always revealed the same result. No problem found. The visits to the sleep doctor were the same as well his condition was worsening and chronic. and yet never once did the sleep doctor ever give the drugs a second thought. The known side effects for both of these drugs were suicide for ages between 16 to 22. Until his death I never read about any of the products he was on.
    On July 16, 2013 the day began with Mike not sleeping, he seemed angry, exhausted. he was getting ready to help us out at our office. Once there it seemed like nothing went his way and at one point got into argument with his dad, told me he hated him and decided to go into his office to talk to him. He began to cry, I had to leave for an appointment and I waved to him through a window. I could see him crying. He got up and just left our office. Later we would find that he called his pastor, his cousins and a friend all did not reply. One girl friend of his did, she told him to meet her for drinks he told her what happened and he needed to save money and needed to be at his training job shortly. Within a 15 minute span wrote us a suicide letter, drove off and shot himself. a few minutes after he did a passer bye called 911. They took him to the hospital. The police came to our office to inform us we need to get to the hospital. The shock of all shock.... He passed away 1:04 am on the 17 of July. I never thought I could be so lost and broken as I am. I miss you so much Michael!
  • Zopiclone causing sweating and memory loss
    Been on 10mg Zopivane for probably 5 - 10 years. In 2013 migrated to 15mg Zopiclone. Previously experienced hot flashes 3 times a week and in 2013 has increased to 3 to 5 times a night. Usually I have 3 hours sleep, then after midnight the flashed start. In the morning there are sopping wet clothes all around my bed. Doctor has prescribed a beta blocker to alleviate the sweats, but there is no change. Short term memory is poor - could the Z pill be causing this?
  • Oxybutynin chloride and chest pain
    A urologist prescribed Vesicare (and Estrace cream) early in 2013 for urge incontinance. When hospitalized for cellulitis (never had it before) in May (2013), I took lots of I-V Clindamycin. The hospital had Ditropan on their formulary, and the urologist switched to it (it was cheaper)--and I continued taking Oxybutynin throughout the summer (2013).

    Before 2013, I had had rare episodes of chest pain (not proven angina) no more than once a year. While on Vesicare and Dipropan, the frequency of chest pain increased to once a month, then once a week, then twice a week, then every other day (by late summer). In July I had a treadmill-EKG (with radioisotope) in USA and my family-practice-physician said it was normal and that my chest pain is NOT heart-related. He took me off Indocin and I have since quit taking Meloxicam and aspirin (no NSAIDs now). I returned to where I live overseas in early August and continued to have chest pain with increasing frequency. In the city where I live, it is too hot in the summer, and too cold in the winter. I saw an American doctor (overseas) in mid-August and my heart rate was irregular (I've never been told THAT before). My blood pressure is usually perfect, but this time my diastolic BP was the lowest it's ever been (about 50). My EKG was said to be normal (except slow rate). My normal pulse is about 60. The doctor said the low diastolic blood pressure was my body's way of helping me "beat the heat," and she suggested I lower the dosage of Oxybutynin from 15 mg daily to 10 mg daily--at least until the summer heat abated. [She was concerned about possible synergistic effect of anti-histamine (Claritin) and anti-cholinergic (Oxybutynin).] Having no return of urologic symptoms (which were severe a few months ago), I have since lowered the dosage of Oxybutynin from 10 mg daily to 5 mg daily.

    I am 68 (had total thyroidectomy in 1978, 3 C-sections in the early 1980's, and two total knee replacement surgeries in 1998 and 2007). I had elevated anti-TPO in 2012 and a new dx of auto-immune thyroiditis early in 2013 (but 98% of my thyroid tissue was removed in 1978).

More reviews for: Gravol, Zopiclone

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (2 years ago):

  • Drugs are not all taken on a daily basis oth than cymbalta, chronic migraine prevent, and trazodone and zopiclone at night. The rest are on an as needed basis. Like morphine only as last resort for migraine rescue, and robax only when back pain with out migraine, also nyquil only when needed during cold/flu sickness.

    Reply

  • From this study (3 years ago):

  • To what extent do these meds interact to produce negative side effects? I am especially concerned about impact on present and future cognitive functioning/memory and mood problems

    Reply

  • From this study (4 years ago):

  • Even taking this much medication to sleep sometimes I am still awake.This is very unpleasant.I feel like I am having an out of body experience.I do not know how to describe it clearly.

    Reply

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Gravol (dimenhydrinate) is often used to treat nausea. Zopiclone (eszopiclone) is often used to treat insomnia. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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