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Review: taking Klonopin and Percocet together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Klonopin and Percocet together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Klonopin and Percocet. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 2,376 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

 

 

 

 

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Klonopin and Percocet >>>

What are the drugs

Klonopin has active ingredients of clonazepam. It is often used in stress and anxiety. (latest outcomes from 31,316 Klonopin users)

Percocet has active ingredients of acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from 26,466 Percocet users)

On Mar, 2, 2015: 2,376 people who take Klonopin, Percocet are studied

Klonopin, Percocet outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Klonopin (clonazepam)
- Percocet (acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Klonopin is effective31.58%
(6 of 19 people)
57.14%
(16 of 28 people)
47.06%
(8 of 17 people)
18.18%
(4 of 22 people)
44.44%
(16 of 36 people)
66.67%
(10 of 15 people)
40.00%
(4 of 10 people)
n/a
Percocet is effective41.46%
(17 of 41 people)
47.06%
(16 of 34 people)
50.00%
(4 of 8 people)
65.00%
(13 of 20 people)
34.62%
(9 of 26 people)
38.46%
(5 of 13 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Klonopin is effective44.66%
(46 of 103 people)
40.91%
(18 of 44 people)
Percocet is effective45.19%
(47 of 104 people)
48.84%
(21 of 43 people)

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Klonopin is effectiven/an/an/a24.56%
(14 of 57 people)
17.78%
(16 of 90 people)
35.71%
(15 of 42 people)
26.53%
(13 of 49 people)
23.08%
(6 of 26 people)
Percocet is effectiven/an/an/a32.14%
(18 of 56 people)
17.59%
(19 of 108 people)
23.53%
(12 of 51 people)
28.57%
(14 of 49 people)
20.00%
(5 of 25 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
PneumoniaDepressionMuscle PainDepressionAnxietyDepressionAsthmaPain
Ileus ParalyticPulmonary EmbolismDrowsinessDeep Vein ThrombosisDepressionAnxietyArthropathyNausea
Toxic EncephalopathyDeep Vein ThrombosisNauseaSuicidal IdeationPainSuicide AttemptAnxietyAnxiety
DehydrationIleusNeck PainPathological GamblingSuicide AttemptIntentional OverdoseAnkle FractureDepression
ConstipationPathological GamblingConfusionHypersexualityIntentional OverdoseAggressionDepressionFall
AtelectasisSuicidal IdeationAnxiety DisorderObsessive-compulsive Personality DisorderDeep Vein ThrombosisDiabetes MellitusOral TorusBack Pain
Confusional StateNauseaMajor DepressionEmotional DistressAggressionConvulsionWeight IncreasedHeadache
DeliriumDrug Exposure During PregnancyBack PainVentricular TachycardiaBipolar DisorderFatigueUrinary Tract DisorderDizziness
Small Intestinal ObstructionPremature LabourDeep Vein ThrombosisPleural EffusionMental Status ChangesMuscle WeaknessPneumoniaArthralgia
RhinorrhoeaCompulsive ShoppingLightheadednessCardiac Failure CongestiveCholecystitis ChronicAbnormal BehaviourOsteomyelitisDyspnoea

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
PainPain
NauseaAnxiety
AnxietyDepression
DepressionBack Pain
FallNausea
Back PainHeadache
ArthralgiaFall
HeadacheDizziness
DizzinessChest Pain
DyspnoeaDrug Ineffective

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
AnorexiaOtitis MediaPainInsomniaNauseaPainPainPain
Ill-defined DisorderPainDeathNauseaPainDepressionAnxietyAnxiety
SwellingSkin InfectionCholecystitis ChronicUrinary Tract InfectionDepressionNauseaNauseaFall
Weight IncreasedPneumoniaGallbladder DisorderVomitingAnxietyBack PainDiarrhoeaDyspnoea
Diabetes MellitusDevice Related InfectionPancreatitisCholecystitis ChronicHeadacheAnxietyDepressionNausea
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusFeeding Tube ComplicationSphincter Of Oddi DysfunctionDyspnoeaDizzinessFallFallAsthenia
Neuroleptic Malignant SyndromeOverdoseAbdominal Pain UpperDrug Withdrawal SyndromeDizzinessHeadacheHeadache
Pulmonary EmbolismDrug AbuserBack PainDrug IneffectiveConstipationBack PainPneumonia
Suicide AttemptLoss Of ConsciousnessCholelithiasisDrug DependenceFatiguePain In ExtremityAnaemia
Systemic Lupus ErythematosusHeadacheAbdominal PainDyspnoeaArthralgiaWeight DecreasedBack Pain

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Klonopin and Percocet?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Klonopin and Percocet
- support group for people who take Klonopin
- support group for people who take Percocet

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

  • I have heard that taking clonazepam and diltiazem can cause bronchitis anyone have this reaction
    I have bronchitis at least once a year, excess mucus and throat clearing. Tightening of the airways, mostly at night.was wondering if drug interactions could be the cause.
  • Would it be possible to have garlic odor on breath if taking percocet
    want to no if someone is taking Percocet can they have an odor of garlic on there breath?
  • I'm taking hydrocodone for shoulder surgery pain does it cause restless leg syndrome
    I had rotator cuff surgery about five months ago and now I have cut way back on the hydrocodone that the doctor prescribed and I am having restless legs and arms just wondering if the hydrocodone is what was doing it and will it go away once I completely quit taking the drug . I only take the drug after therapy maybe 2 to 3 times a week. I have question my doctor about it and she seems to think no more than what I am taking that it is not affecting my restless leg but what I have researched it could be the cause. Can anyone give me some feedback on this?
  • Does clonazapam cause tinnitus or ringing in the ears?
    Patient fell a year ago and injured her neck and broke a bone in her arm. Has had severe pain in her neck. Getting acupuncture frequently. Recently tried to change medication from Valium to Clonazepam, and developed severe tinnitus. She said she only missed two days of Valium. She also says she has skipped days without taking valium and never had a problem. She says Clonazepam caused the tinnitus. I can't find anything that states a side effect of clonazepam is tinnitus.
  • Can daliresp cause sever lower back pain and light perioud bleeding?
    I started Daliresp tab.and i began having a really bad rash in my private parts .. by the 3rd day i started having awful pain in my lower back with some light blood in my urin, now i have this severe pain and its as if i have a light perioud. i had a comple hysterectomy in 2003,due to overian cancer. i will call my pulmonaligist who put me on this medication on monday the 26th . but i am concern thats why i am asking ...

More questions for: Klonopin, Percocet

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Percocet and memory loss
    A close friend of mine has been using prescription Percocet for 5 to 6 years. Her MD first prescribed the lowest dosage possible to be taken 3 to 4 times daily for pain. I am aware that this medication frequently needs to be increased because it will become less effective. I don't know how many times he has increased the dosage but it has been many times. I believe now she is taking the highest dosage of it up to four to six times daily and six tablets at a time. I have made several attempts to tell her the information I know about Percocet and to have her to ask her MD about her now short and long term memory problems. Her response is to shout at me, telling me she needs that much for pain and to mind my own business when I tell her about the negative side effects I see, especially her daily and hourly memory problems. She has also said she has no reason to speak to her doctor about memory problems. I think that is because she fears he might lower the dosage. My concern about her poor memory only causes her to tell me I am the one with a bad memory, even though the only pain meds I infrequently take are OTC ones. According to my MD, I have been told my memory for my age of 63 is perfectly fine and better than most for my age. Also I take no medications with the side effects that cause memory problems. In addition when my MD prescribes new medication I always read the info that accompanies them, do research online and pay attention to all warnings and side effect info. The few times I have had side effects they have only been GI problems and I have consulted my MD regarding those and work with my MD for an alternative medication. My friend NEVER EVER reads any of the accompanying material that comes with her prescriptions. Also she never looks up her medications online to get additional information, including possible side effects. I worry about her very much and fear she now has an addiction to Percocet. Several years ago she asked her MD for Chantix to stop smoking, never reading the info supplied with the prescription. I urged to read the info and side effects. She declined, telling me she knew what she was doing. After two weeks of using Chantix she had a mental break down and ended up on the psych ward of our local hospital for 3 weeks. That medication was the first that began to cause her to have memory problems. She accepted that fact for about a month then dismissed it claiming her memory problems were over. They weren't because she was still taking Percocet. I understand no one wants to be told by a friend they suspect that person has memory problems, but I haven't done so to be mean or cruel, but only out of great love and concern. At this point with all the Percocet she takes daily she really is at a level to be considered an addict and I fear soon she will convince her MD to increase the dosage because it no longer controls her pain. I've written this review as a cautionary tale to inform others to be vigilant with their family, friends and loved ones as Percocet can and does cause short and long term memory loss. Although all my efforts to assist and speak to my friend have failed, please don't give up on those in your life who you notice are experiencing memory loss signs that take Percocet. If possible speak to them or their MD. Oh, and be prepared to be yelled at that you are the one with memory problems or to be told to mind your own business. And please, please read the information that accompanies all of your medications.
  • Panic after using flonase
    I was diagnosed with nasal polyps and put on Flonase (a steroid nose spray). It worked well to dry up post-nasal drip but I ended up with a bad case of panic and fear. I had overcome episodes of these nervous disorders but the Flonase brought it all back. I still suffer from panic even though I stopped the Flonase months ago. I had a bad attack on a bridge and also inside a grocery store. Personnel had to take me to the store office to calm me down. I am nearly agoraphobic now. I do go out alone but try to avoid after-dark. My life has been turned into daily dread of another attack. To think that I was more than ten years FREE of panic until I took the Flonase makes me feel so regretful that I ever took that stuff. It should be banned as there is enough evidence to do so from many people who now suffer debilitating and recurring panic.
  • A life of depression and fatigue (1 response)
    1) Family history of depression, 2) Diagnosed depression 1964-not treated until 1973, 3) Worked in medical field 35 years, 4) Emergency on-call 24/7, 5) Hospital 15 times major depression, 6) Tried nearly all MAOI, TCA, SSRI, SNRI, and ECT. 7) 100% Disability in 1998 for depression. Now at age 70 I have dysthymia, chronic fatigue, COPD, and PTSD. My recommendation to younger people - do not over stress,
    do not smoke, avoid horrific or traumatic situations and try to find some enjoyment in life. If you have symptoms like mine seek early treatment put balance in your life. The often heard recommendations - get plenty of sleep, eat properly, learn to relax and avoid bad habits should not be ignored, they are critical to good physical and mental health.
  • 3 strong drugs together against neuropathic pain
    Neuropathic pain debuted when I was 24, now I'm 50. Received diagnosed with Ehler-Danlos syndrome (EDS), joint hypermobility type, when I was 35 years old. So it can take some time to get a diagnose. And as EDS-patient I do not belong to any clinic. Orthopedics says that EDS is not orthopedic, rheumatology says that EDS is not an autoimmune disease, GPs say that EDS is too difficult, and so on. Sooner or later we all end up at Psychiatry, even if we are not depressed.

    The first kind of pain I got when I was 24 came from low back, but I experienced as pelvic pain and leg pain. It was clearly a neuropathic pain, but it took years to find out. Later it was treated by a pain clinic with cortisone around the genitofemoral nerves (both sides). Since this treatment didn't result in lasting freedom from pain, the pain clinic started to give me RF (radio frequency) treatment. This made the pain disappeared after one year, and I was 80% free from it between 2002 and 2014, 12 years. The pain doctors said pain could return after 10 years.

    The other kind of neuropathic pain started 2003 with intense stomach pain. During 6 months I could hardly eat nothing due to nausea and vomiting. After this 6 months, stomach pain changed to almost unbearable pain in upper back.
    What happened 2003, and what all the doctors missed, was that the right lowest ribs slid up over the sternum. This rib dislocation is till there today, but now with a lot of cartilage formed around the rib where it is stuck in the lower end of the sternum. The dislocation is clearly visible on X-ray. This has greatly affected the thoracic spine. I have a scoliosis which I had not before 2003. And I still have severe pain in the thoracic spine.

    It was initially treated with morphine daily, and later with Durogesic (fentanyl), but this didn't help much. 2005 I was hospitalized because I had too much pain to take care of myself and my hygiene. After some months the doctors started to give me clonazepam because the muscles along the spine was in a chronic seizures. Clonazepam helped, but I could still have a lot of pain in two vertebrae in the thoracic spine. It felt as if someone drilled into the vertebrae without anesthesia. After a few months, doctors also prescribed me methadone. Then the pain disappeared almost completely. Since 2006, I have eaten clonazepam and methadone every day, and I need to sleep in an armchair to not get more pain because of moving during sleep.

    There are side effects. After 1,5 years with clonazepam and methadone I started to have panic attacks. Or rather one long panic attack which didn't stop before I got treatment with amitryptilin and pregabalin (Lyrica). These 2 medicines stopped the panic disorder completely after some hours, and the panic was then gone. Then I got side effects of these 2 medicines, amitryptilin & Lyrica, too. I gained a lot of weight (from 83 to 148 kg) and got much water (edema) in both my legs under the knees and in both feet. The feet could swallow to the double size. 2012 I stopped with amitryptilin and started to loose weight again (in Aug 2014 below 80 kg) and get less water in my legs. Today I eat as little medicines I can, but I have to take methadone, clonazepam and Lyrica every day, twice. If I try to take away one of these 3 medicines, I got pain problems at once. Lyrica is the most painful one to take away. In Sept-Dec 2013 I lowered Lyrica from 300 mg daily, to 150, then to 75 and finally 0 mg. The pain I had was extremely difficult to handle. It didn't help to take more methadone or anything else. I have checked on Internet and found that many people got pain from quitting with Lyrica. Most people start eating it again. So did I. But 2006 and 2007 it was enough to treat the pain with methadone and clonazepam, I got the Lyrica against anxiety not pain. But today I take Lyrica against pain.

    Beside weight gain and leg edema, clonazepam and Lyrica significantly affect the sexual desire. And Lyrica alone makes it almost impossible to ejaculate. All four drugs together (clonazepam, methadone, amitryptiline and Lyrica), make one forget all about sex life. You don't even miss it. When I stopped with amitryptiline and lowered Lyrica (still taking clonazepam and methadone), I could suddenly easily get erections again, feel desire, but not getting orgasms. This is quite difficult to deal with.

    The pain pattern is greatly affected, by pain and by the medicines. So is the mood. I get something which feels like heavy depression, especially if I take the medicines late that day. I should take a medicine like methadone 3 times a day, because the effects of the tablet lasts around 8 hours. But I take them every 12 hours, to have a low consumption in case doctors prescribe them too late (which happens, and then it's good to have a spouse going to the pharmacy buying them for you, because you have too much pain to go yourself).

    Since methadone is also used for treating heroine addicts, medical staff treat you with disrespect when they see that it says "methadone" in your health record. I need to show a certificate that says that I deal with chronic neuropathic pain, that I never have had problems with drug addiction, to get normal respect.

    I wanted to share this because I think I am alone in the world with these medicines in combination against neuropathic pain caused by hypermobile joints, joint dislocation and muscle spasms. After trying almost everything else, including surgery cutting nerves, methadone, clonazepam and Lyrica seems to be the only way to kill my pain. But it's a life where you always is questioned, because of the use of methadone. I can guarantee that everybody in the world should accept these medicines if they had experienced the unbearable pain I had in upper back before they started to give me clonazepam and methadone.
  • Sepsis hallucinations misdiagnosed
    I was admitted to the hospital at 10 p.m., with a total bowel blockage caused by scar-tissue adhesions. I had first gone to the ER at 3 a.m. that morning, but the ER doc misdiagnosed my condition as constipation. I was in extreme pain and also too weak to tell my husband when he first came home that I needed to return to the ER. By the time I returned, I became violently nauseated, and vomited repeatedly. Then a gastro-nasal tube was forced down my nose and into my stomach. I began hallucinating at approximately 5 p.m. the following day. I did not realize I was hallucinating, and thought my experiences were real. Some were quite coherent, such as believing there was a book sitting on table at home with a photo on the front showing a sculpture in white marble of a woman's hands holding the Bible, with barbed wire wrapped around her hands. I thought the sculpture had won the Nobel prize, and the book was the biography of the sculptor, whose mother had gone to extraordinary lengths to keep him safe from the Nazis. Some may actually have occurred during dreams, and were wildly improbable, but I don't recall ever going to sleep. At one point, I thought I was at a rest stop on the NJ turnpike, and saw the Nobel-winning sculptor there, working on a wood sculpture. The sculptor turned out to be the maintenance man on the hospital floor. I pulled out the naso-gastral tube three times, but was unaware that I had done so, although I do remember believing that I was buried beneath peat moss and feeling suffocated as I clawed my way out. I also thought I was at a party being given by a law firm which had sold its building to a school for gifted children, but I (also a lawyer) had been deposited there by my nurse and her boyfriend, who were supposed to have taken me to the OR. Some scenes from a book I had been reading made their way into my delusions, which were so real to me that I actually called some of the people involved later on and asked if the events had really happened. The hallucinations began before surgery and continued afterward. When I awoke from anesthesia, I thought the hospital staff was painting the doors to my upstairs bathroom, a project I'd been involved with before the blockage struck. I asked them how they knew what colors to use. They thought I was joking, and confirmed that they had gotten the colors right. Finally a neurologist was summoned, and I told her I was on the passenger ramp at La Guardia airport (instead of in a hospital in NC), and that I'd been born in Havana, Cuba (instead of Baltimore, MD.) I believed myself to be a member of the ruling party in Cuba (pre-Castro) and during an outdoor ceremony, an earthquake had struck, causing ancient monuments to come tumbling down. Later, I was bobbing in harbor waters near a huge ocean liner, with plastic bottles and other detritus floating by. The foregoing are only a small sample of the multitude of hallucinations. Occasionally, I was only an observer of astonishing events, but usually I was a participant. I recognized my husband and friends, but told them about many of these events, believing they had happened. The neurologist diagnosed clonazepam withdrawal. My other doctors later said this was unlikely, as I took clonazepam in small amounts on an erratic schedule, and was not dependent on the drug, although my prescription called for 3 mg. daily. Physician friends said my symptoms were more likely the result of sepsis. I did contract a urinary-tract infection from the catheter, and was being given antibiotics. Additionally, the nature of my underlying condition, and the delay in diagnosis and treatment, may have contributed to the sepsis. Hallucinations occur in only a very small percentage of sepsis sufferers, and in only a small percentage of those withdrawing suddenly from clonazepam. However, I do fit the profile of those who do experience hallucinations with sepsis, being female and aged 62 at the time of this description. After the three-day period, I returned to normal, although believing that my hallucinations had been real persisted for some days afterward. I recovered quickly from the surgery, although the pain persisted for a while, and I was walking easily (dragging my IV with me) through the hospital halls. This was the ONLY symptom I had. Not all the hallucinations were unpleasant -- in fact, they were highly interesting -- but they were incredibly complex. I still remember all the details, better than I remember what actually happened yesterday. Except for the urinary-tract infection, I had no other adverse effects from hospitalization -- no fever, chills, nausea, sweating, headaches, trembling or anything of that kind. The bowel blockage and the surgery were of course not fun, but in a way the hallucinations were fascinating. My own feeling, and that of the doctors who know me and my medical issues, is that my experiences were caused by sepsis, not clonazepam withdrawal, and the antibiotics I was given are probably what saved me.

More reviews for: Klonopin, Percocet

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (3 months ago):

  • I was on Chantix for the "allotted" time through the Air Force. It was not long enough so I stopped taking it (sweating stopped) After about 3 months, I was able to get Chantix through the mail from the military and as soon as I reached a stable blood level (I'm assuming it was because of the level of medication in my system) I started sweating again. I wake up at night drenched in sweat. I can be sitting on the couch during the day and simply think about being hot and I start boiling in my own skin. My skin gets hot to the touch. Is this normal? Thanks for any info you may give.

    Reply

  • From this study (5 months ago):

  • I just started taking the Percocet and the Klonopin. I have taken Klonopin before and have never noticed the Acid Reflux. Whilst I have had Acid Reflux in the past, Omeprazole has always cleared it up if taken daily. Omeprazole and other medications like it are doing nothing, even with the addition of aids such as Pepto-Bismol. I was just treated for a sinus infection and am also concerned that this may be still be an issue with drainage entering the stomach. However, having had allergies all my life, it seems that the Percocet is the main culprit in why I am having this sudden, uncontrollable acid reflux.

    Reply

  • From this study (11 months ago):

  • My brother was prescribed 190 pecocet 15, after first being prescribed 120 Vocoprophen, 90 klonipin, and 90 aderol in the month of march. On March 28 he was prescribed 190 percocet 30 mg, along with the same drugs mentioned above. On April 3rd, he took his nightly dose of all meds excluding aderol. On April 4th, he was not responding when tried to wake up. He was snoring loudly so his daughter left for work, she came home early that day to check on her dad and he was dead. The cause was respiratory failure. I feel li? This dr Yank in nashville should not be allowed to write pain meds anyway as he is a psychiatrist and not a pain doc. I need to understand this better and I hope someone can make me understand more about this.

    Reply

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Klonopin (clonazepam) is often used to treat stress and anxiety. Percocet (acetaminophen; oxycodone hydrochloride) is often used to treat pain. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

   

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