eHealthMe - Personalized health information & community eHealthMe - Personalized health information & community

Personalized health information & community

  Tools   Community
All drugs: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
All conditions: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Check symptoms       Ask question       Write review       Answered/ Unanswered       Reviews       WellConnected

Review: Lexapro and Seroquel Xr





Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Lexapro and Seroquel Xr together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Lexapro and Seroquel Xr. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 4,148 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Lexapro and Seroquel Xr >>>

What are the drugs

Lexapro has active ingredients of escitalopram oxalate. It is often used in depression. (latest outcomes from Lexapro 39,406 users)

Seroquel xr has active ingredients of quetiapine fumarate. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (latest outcomes from Seroquel xr 9,505 users)

On Dec, 4, 2014: 4,148 people who take Lexapro, Seroquel Xr are studied

Lexapro, Seroquel Xr outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate)
- Seroquel Xr (quetiapine fumarate)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Lexapro is effective16.67%
(3 of 18 people)
35.48%
(11 of 31 people)
43.48%
(10 of 23 people)
25.93%
(7 of 27 people)
35.14%
(13 of 37 people)
37.50%
(6 of 16 people)
10.00%
(1 of 10 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
Seroquel Xr is effective16.00%
(4 of 25 people)
36.67%
(11 of 30 people)
50.00%
(10 of 20 people)
48.57%
(17 of 35 people)
66.67%
(20 of 30 people)
68.75%
(11 of 16 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusDizzinessDiabetes Mellitus
Suicidal IdeationDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
SomnolenceInsomniaObesityObesitySuicidal IdeationBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDiabetes MellitusWeight Increased
ConvulsionDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlWeight IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDepressionObesityAstheniaDepression
DepressionBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlHyperglycaemiaBlood Cholesterol IncreasedHyperlipidaemiaSomnolenceBlood Cholesterol Increased
AgitationSuicide AttemptInsomniaPancreatitisPancreatitisDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlBlood Cholesterol IncreasedAnxiety
Suicide AttemptHeadacheDiabetic KetoacidosisAnxietyObesitySuicidal IdeationDehydrationSuicidal Ideation
Blood Cholesterol IncreasedWeight IncreasedSuicidal IdeationDepressionSuicide AttemptNeuropathy PeripheralCholelithiasisPancreatitis
OverdoseOverdoseDepressionWeight IncreasedInsomniaHeadacheUrinary Tract InfectionInsomnia
Diabetes MellitusType 1 Diabetes MellitusBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlWeight IncreasedBlood Triglycerides IncreasedHypercholesterolaemiaDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate Control

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Lexapro is effective37.50%
(39 of 104 people)
20.00%
(12 of 60 people)
Seroquel Xr is effective46.60%
(48 of 103 people)
45.76%
(27 of 59 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
Diabetes MellitusDiabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
DepressionSuicidal Ideation
Weight IncreasedAnxiety
Blood Cholesterol IncreasedDepression
PancreatitisBlood Cholesterol Increased
ObesityWeight Increased
InsomniaInsomnia
AnxietyPancreatitis
Diabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlSuicide Attempt

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Lexapro is effective0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a9.68%
(3 of 31 people)
27.08%
(13 of 48 people)
18.46%
(12 of 65 people)
20.75%
(11 of 53 people)
17.78%
(8 of 45 people)
13.33%
(4 of 30 people)
Seroquel Xr is effective100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a13.33%
(4 of 30 people)
28.00%
(14 of 50 people)
29.23%
(19 of 65 people)
34.62%
(18 of 52 people)
31.82%
(14 of 44 people)
16.13%
(5 of 31 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Diabetes MellitusSuicidal IdeationSuicidal IdeationDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusAnxiety
PancreatitisDiarrhoeaWeight IncreasedType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusDepression
Suicidal IdeationMood SwingsDiabetes MellitusWeight IncreasedWeight IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedConfusional State
Ovarian CystAbnormal BehaviourSomnolenceHeadacheBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlAnxietySuicidal Ideation
Suicide AttemptTicManiaDyspnoeaObesityNeuropathy PeripheralDepressionDiabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusSuicide AttemptGallbladder DisorderInsomniaDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlWeight IncreasedInsomniaDiarrhoea
Extrapyramidal DisorderAnxietyBipolar DisorderAbdominal PainDepressionPancreatitisHyperglycaemiaPain
Intentional OverdoseAngerDepressionVomitingSuicidal IdeationObesityNauseaWeight Decreased
DepressionCryingDiabetic KetoacidosisDizzinessPancreatitisDepressionWeight IncreasedFall
Gastrointestinal HaemorrhageAggressionNauseaSuicidal IdeationDiabetic NeuropathyHyperlipidaemiaPancreatitisType 2 Diabetes Mellitus

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Lexapro and Seroquel Xr?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Lexapro and Seroquel Xr
- support group for people who take Lexapro
- support group for people who take Seroquel Xr

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

  • Requip cause dysphagia
    an increase caused me not to be able to swallow at all
  • What is the reaction to vivitrol and ritalin?
    25 year old client in early recovery from opioid dependence takes ritalin and seroquel and wants to add vivitrol. What are the risks and side effects?
  • Has anyone been helped by taking lexapro and wellbutrin? (1 answer)
    I am the mom of a 22 year old who is trying to get through college and can't seem to find the right meds for depression. She is taking Lexapro and I am wondering if adding Wellbutrin will help.
  • Does anyone have experience of taking the supplement gaba with seroquel/quetiapine at night to aid sleep?. taking quetiapine 150 mg gives inconsistent sleep.
    With seroquel my sleep is inconsistent and if I have a bad night's sleep, I don't just feel tired, I feel breathless, headache, strange sensations, as if I haven't slept off side effects. It can make me feel relaxed when I take it but not sleepy.
  • Can my eye twitch be because of lexapro?
    So I have had symptoms of anxiety and depression due to a lot of stressors and disasters that happened in my life over the past two years. As my anxiety got worse after a breast biopsy, I started freaking out and thinking I may have MS because my sister has MS. So I went to my GP and she decided my symptoms do not follow the symptoms of MS or any similar problem and it should most likely be anxiety. She put me on Lexapro and Clonazepam. At first I was very hesitant to take medication but as my symptoms got worse I decided to give it a try. I was on Lexopro 5 mg for about two months and then I went to 10 mg, and I would take 1 or 2 Clonazepam a day. And this all started 5 months ago. And things seemed to be working just fine.Until about two months ago I started having this freaking annoying eye twitch on my upper left eyelid. I have had eye twitches before but they always go away after a couple of days or a week top. This one has been lasting for 2 months now and seems to be just getting worse. I went to the GP and my eye doctor and they still found no cause and said it's probably stress and anxiety. I have not been overly stressed and I get plenty of sleep, 10 hrs or more! and I stopped taking caffeine and alcohol after the twitch started. Any idea? Could it be because of medication? I also need to add I have had thumb twitching and severe spasms in my muscles around my right thumb starting in May (before taking any medication).

More questions for: Lexapro, Seroquel Xr

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Escitalopram /narcolepsy
    Began taking escitalopram one month ago. Having narcoleptic type sleep incidents as well as unwanted suicidal thoughts. Legs and arms also go out. Sleeping up to thirteen or more hours per day.
  • Bipolar patient extremely violent on seraquel
    I have been diagnosed bipolar for over 10 years. 3 years ago I was taken off of topamax and my seraquel was upped to 300 mg from 100 because I was pregnant. I was very violent! Punching, breaking stuff, in jail, in the psych ward. Yes pregnancy and bipolar are not a perfect combination. I too thought it was the hormones. My husband and split several times over me punching him. We moved to a state cross country so there was no more family drama. Nothing worked! Over the last 3 years my life has been hell! I happen to run out of my seroquel (tg) it took 2 weeks to arrive. In that time my body went thru horrible withdrawals. I vowed I wouldn't take it any longer. I've been seraquel free for 2 months. I'm now on gabapentin and proud to say I have no anger issues! Not 1 punch has
    been thrown. I feel like a totally different person.
  • Seroquel and iron deficiency?
    I've been taking Seroquel for about four year, I have been having symptoms similar to hypothyroidism, and just found out I have an iron deficiency. The doctor said my platelets are smaller than average, and it is possible that my grandmother is anemic. But in trying to study Seroquel I kept finding things that made me wonder if Seroquel could be linked to iron deficiency.
  • Transition from mirtazapine to cymbalta (bipolar ii) 6 week duration taken in conjunction with seroquel, propranalol and implanon
    In early September I approached my Psychiatrist to report that I was having sleep paralysis episodes as well as insatiable appetite. I had put on about 20lb in the space of 6 months since the sleep paralysis started.

    My Psychiatrist opted to wean me off the Mirtazapine and onto Cymbalta. I have now been on 60mg of Cymbalta for about 4 weeks and completely titrated off the Mirtazapine.

    I have noted that since switching to Cymbalta that I no longer have the insatiable appetite, nor have I had any further sleep paralysis episodes (though I have had a brain MRI to rule out any physiological issues - yet to receive results).

    I have noticed that I have had mild to moderate rolling nausea with the Cymbalta and that I now have food aversions. Food does not interest me as much anymore and I find that certain foods (mostly processed snacks) are no longer palatable. I also find that I become full after much smaller meal portions.

    I have found that I can no longer drink wine or spirits because they now taste awful however I can still tolerate certain brands of beer. I also no longer enjoy drinking cola.

    I am also on the Implanon Implant. I have had this implant inserted for about 12 months and my cycles have been rather regular. Since starting the Cymbalta I have had some breakthrough bleeding yet my periods have not been as painful, though they have been heavier and longer.

    My Psychiatrist will commence titrating me off the Seroquel in about two weeks and onto Topamax as it is his belief it will be less sedating than the Seroquel and that it will hopefully help as a mood stabiliser, treat my migraines and allow me to come off the Propranolol. he also hopes that I am able to loose some of the weight gained since the sleep paralysis episodes started.

    As a side note regarding the Propranolol, I have naturally low blood pressure and I find while Propranalol is generally an effective migraine prophylactic, (I do get some breakthrough migraines) it does make my blood pressure even lower which leads to dizziness and faintness when I stand up too quickly from a recumbent position.
  • Lexapro and memory loss
    I actually have no idea what other medicine I was on the week I took Lexapro, it was back at the end of February 2014 right before I checked myself into the psych hospital. I formed no memory for a whole week just because of one drug! My friends and family tell me what happened that week and I have called them a liar because there is no recall from that week! I have been on psychiatric drugs for over 14 years and have never had such a horrible reaction as I did with Lexapro! The side effects do not include this reaction, but I didn't sleep at all that week or so I am told and there is just nothing, not even a little memory. Take this as you will I am not saying everyone gets this side effect I am just saying it is not impossible. I learned a lesson I don't remember, but will never take Lexapro again! It was dangerous for me!

More reviews for: Lexapro, Seroquel Xr

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (1 month ago):

  • doc moc on Apr, 25, 2013:

    BREAK down FOOL!

    Reply

    Rhs on Oct, 13, 2012:

    Get your medical records
    and consult w/your doctor

    Reply

    trust1983 on Dec, 3, 2012:

    Is it true in the states that a psych doc can up and just leave and refuse to treat you because you tried to kill yourself, especially if you didn't have a contact for life with you r doc?

    Reply

Post a new comment    OR    Read more comments

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) is often used to treat depression. Seroquel Xr (quetiapine fumarate) is often used to treat bipolar disorder. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

   

About - Terms of service - Privacy policy - Press - Testimonials - Contact us

 
© 2014 eHealthMe.com. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of eHealthMe.com's terms of service and privacy policy.