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Review: taking Remeron and Vyvanse together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Remeron and Vyvanse together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Remeron and Vyvanse. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 43 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

Personalized health information: on eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA and social media since 1977. Our tools are free and anonymous. 66 million people have used us. 200+ peer-reviewed medical journals have referenced our original studies. Start now >>>

 

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What are the drugs

Remeron has active ingredients of mirtazapine. It is often used in depression. (latest outcomes from 12,858 Remeron users)

Vyvanse has active ingredients of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. It is often used in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (latest outcomes from 7,909 Vyvanse users)

On Apr, 28, 2015: 43 people who take Remeron, Vyvanse are studied

Remeron, Vyvanse outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Remeron (mirtazapine)
- Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Remeron is effective33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
33.33%
(2 of 6 people)
n/a66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
Vyvanse is effectiven/a50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
0.00%
(0 of 4 people)
42.86%
(3 of 7 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Remeron is effective11.11%
(1 of 9 people)
36.36%
(4 of 11 people)
Vyvanse is effective27.27%
(3 of 11 people)
60.00%
(6 of 10 people)

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Remeron is effectiven/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
14.29%
(1 of 7 people)
5.00%
(1 of 20 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
Vyvanse is effectiven/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
14.29%
(3 of 21 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
CompulsionsWeight GainCompulsive HoardingShort-term Memory LossUrticariaConstipationDepressionMobility Decreased
Compulsive ShoppingVision BlurredCompulsive ShoppingLow TestosteroneHivesHivesHypoaesthesia Facial
Compulsive HoardingLack Of Strength, Muscle Weakness, WeaknessObsessive-compulsive DisorderDepressionUrticariaMultiple Sclerosis Relapse
DyspnoeaPoor Peripheral CirculationCreatine Urine AbnormalSleep DisorderDiabetes Mellitus Insulin-dependentNasopharyngitis
DystoniaDiabetes Mellitus Insulin-dependentConstipationFatigue
Poor Quality SleepSexual InhibitionHeadache
ManiaMood SwingsAdverse Drug Reaction
Obsessive-compulsive DisorderAnxiety AggravatedEye Pain
Sexual InhibitionShort-term Memory LossFall
Mood SwingsTeeth BrittleConversion Disorder

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
FallImpulsive Behaviour
HeadacheInjection Site Swelling
Hypoaesthesia FacialInjection Site Pain
Mobility DecreasedAccidental Exposure
Eye PainOverdose
Conversion DisorderWeight Increased
Adverse Drug ReactionHallucination, Visual
Bladder DisorderAggression
ContusionSedation
Multiple Sclerosis RelapseVomiting

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/aWeight IncreasedHallucinationDepressionHypokalaemiaMobility DecreasedLow TestosteroneVomiting
OverdoseHeart Rate IncreasedConstipationManiaHeadacheNausea
SedationConvulsionCreatine Urine AbnormalTachycardiaMultiple Sclerosis RelapseBlood Pressure Decreased
AggressionDrug AbuseObsessive-compulsive DisorderBlood Pressure IncreasedNasopharyngitisAbdominal Pain
Hallucination, VisualOverdoseCompulsive ShoppingHivesSinusitis
Impulsive BehaviourGranulocytopeniaCompulsive HoardingShort-term Memory LossPain
Poor Quality SleepLeukopeniaSexual InhibitionUrticariaFatigue
DyspnoeaDependencePoor Peripheral CirculationSleep DisorderHypoaesthesia Facial
DystoniaAccidental ExposureMood SwingsFall
ManiaInjection Site PainAnxiety AggravatedAdverse Drug Reaction

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Get connected: join our support group of Remeron and Vyvanse on

Do you take Remeron and Vyvanse?

 

You are not alone! Join a related support group:
- support group for people who take Remeron
- support group for people who take Vyvanse

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Remeron, Vyvanse

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Caution about remeron!
    As do many folks suffering from fibromyalgia with depression I ended up seeing a psychiatrist; several actually over the years. During my clinical exams in nursing school my anxiety levels were unbearable and my doc changed my AD to Remeron. So what happened? No more anxiety - no emotions at all! ...
  • Longterm vyvanse use and myocarditis
    At 19 years old, I suddenly had a heart attack out of no where that left me with chronic myocarditis and pericarditis. I was perfectly healthy, did not use drugs, ate well, and exercised daily. The doctors could not come up with any explanation, but assumed it was an autoimmune disease. Neither hear ...
  • The zoloft/vyvanse concoction ruined my life. (1 response)
    I started taking these drugs about two months ago. I am diagnosed ADHD by a psychiatrist. I received these medications from a doctor whom I know and is married to a friend my wife. She, the doctor, gave them to me from her personal medications in a plastic baggy. I was given loose instructions fo ...
  • Transition from mirtazapine to cymbalta (bipolar ii) 6 week duration taken in conjunction with seroquel, propranalol and implanon
    In early September I approached my Psychiatrist to report that I was having sleep paralysis episodes as well as insatiable appetite. I had put on about 20lb in the space of 6 months since the sleep paralysis started.

    My Psychiatrist opted to wean me off the Mirtazapine and onto Cymbal ...
  • Patients having false positives while on remeron
    I have had a few patients complain they are failing drug tests for Amphetamines while on remeron, and have claimed to have not used any type of Amphetamine or any (Mixed Salts). These patients are all or were on probation, parole, or under some stipulation. Iv realized most of these patients are tak ...

More reviews for: Remeron, Vyvanse

Comments from related studies:

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Remeron (mirtazapine) is often used to treat depression. Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) is often used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

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