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Review: Suboxone and Benadryl

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Benadryl. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 61 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

Get connected: join a mobile support group for people who take Suboxone and Benadryl >>>

What are the drugs

Suboxone (latest outcomes from 8,245 users) has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal.

Benadryl (latest outcomes from 29,335 users) has active ingredients of diphenhydramine hydrochloride. It is often used in allergies.

On Sep, 15, 2014: 61 people who take Suboxone, Benadryl are studied

Suboxone, Benadryl outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Benadryl (diphenhydramine hydrochloride)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
Benadryl is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
n/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
VomitingSuicidal IdeationOil AcneInsomniaConfusionn/an/aInsomnia
Respiratory Tract InfectionDrug Withdrawal SyndromeNight SweatsVomitingLoss Of Consciousness
PyrexiaFrustrationDrowsinessAgitationFatigue
Septic ShockPlacenta PraeviaNauseaTongue DiscolourationWeight Increased
PneumoniaFatigueVertigoThrombosisOedema Peripheral
Stress FractureAstheniaDepressionConstipation
Visual Acuity ReducedMalaiseEuphoric MoodDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
Tongue DiscolourationMaternal Exposure During PregnancyWeight IncreasedDepression
Pharyngitis StreptococcalDrowsinessToothacheVomiting
ThrombosisOil AcneLoss Of ConsciousnessBack Pain

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective75.00%
(3 of 4 people)
50.00%
(3 of 6 people)
Benadryl is effective25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
20.00%
(1 of 5 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
VomitingInsomnia
DepressionFluid Retention
InsomniaFatigue
Loss Of ConsciousnessDecreased Interest
FatigueCardiovascular Disorder
Euphoric MoodDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
Weight IncreasedJoint Swelling
ToothacheWeight Increased
PainOedema Peripheral
NauseaMemory Impairment

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/a33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
45.45%
(5 of 11 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a
Benadryl is effectiven/an/a0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
12.50%
(1 of 8 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/aDrowsinessLactic AcidosisLoss Of ConsciousnessInsomniaDrug Withdrawal SyndromeStress Fracture
NauseaMalaiseDepressionFluid RetentionSuicidal IdeationAgitation
VertigoDiabetes MellitusEuphoric MoodOedema PeripheralFrustrationRespiratory Tract Infection
Gastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseInsomniaBack PainConjunctivitisThrombosis
Mouth UlcerationWeight IncreasedFatigueCellulitisTongue Discolouration
Pulmonary EmbolismToothacheMemory ImpairmentVomiting
Chest PainFatigueWeight IncreasedVisual Acuity Reduced
PainConstipationCardiovascular DisorderPyrexia
AtaxiaDrug Screen PositiveConstipationSeptic Shock
DysarthriaHyperhidrosisDrug Withdrawal SyndromeCerebrovascular Accident

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Suboxone and Benadryl?

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (6 months ago):

  • Been I'll for 9 months. Just recently found pneumonia. Can't afford dermatologist and do for doesn't know what the hives are. You can write with your finger on my skin and it will show up.

    Reply

  • From this study (3 years ago):

  • i started taking suboxone so i could get off pain pills, had been using 300mg of oxycotton. I started taking dramaene because i would get car sick, and the allergy meds because of seasonal allergys. it also makes me kinda sleepy/out of it.

    Reply

Can you answer these questions (what is this?):

More questions for: Benadryl, Suboxone

You may be interested at these reviews (what is this?):

  • Insomnia from suboxone
    Does Suboxone cause insomnia? Hell yes, I haven't slept properly for years and I wish I had never gone on it. My night is my day and daybreak is when i'm heading off to sleep,I try to wake up about 11 am but that is still half the day gone. I am so so over it, all I can do is reduce my dose and th ...

  • Leg pain and occasional arm and hand pain
    I started having leg pains at night, lower leg felt like the muscle and bone were being pulled causing sharp pain. It was relieved by getting up and walking but would last most of the night. I finally realized after suffering this over and over for months, that it only happened when I had taken be ...

  • Thinking about methadone maintenance? don't do it
    I'm on Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) after failing to stay off of chronic and illicit use of heroin, dilaudid, and methamphetamines. I tried going clean using the subutex/ suboxone method twice and wasn't able to stop using the other drugs. With MMT I am clean of the illicit drugs, but I ...

More reviews for: Benadryl, Suboxone

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Benadryl (diphenhydramine hydrochloride) is often used to treat allergies. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

 

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