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Review: taking Suboxone and Concerta together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Suboxone and Concerta together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Concerta. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 59 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

 

 

 

 

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Suboxone and Concerta >>>

What are the drugs

Suboxone has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal. (latest outcomes from 8,278 Suboxone users)

Concerta has active ingredients of methylphenidate hydrochloride. It is often used in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. (latest outcomes from 10,430 Concerta users)

On Jan, 13, 2015: 59 people who take Suboxone, Concerta are studied

Suboxone, Concerta outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Concerta (methylphenidate hydrochloride)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
80.00%
(4 of 5 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
n/an/a
Concerta is effective28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
n/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
ListlessDrug Withdrawal SyndromeExtensive Interdialytic Weight GainSerum Serotonin DecreasedTired EyesDark Circles Under Eyesn/aMalaise
ArthralgiaMalaiseSweating FeverHungerDepression AggravatedDecreased Eye ContactOverdose
Accidental ExposureCondition AggravatedFlushingWeight IncreasedHivesInappropriate AffectMaternal Exposure During Pregnancy
OverdoseSuicidal IdeationPitting OedemaTired EyesWeight IncreasedObsessive-compulsive DisorderCondition Aggravated
Pleuritic PainSkin HyperpigmentationExhaustion, Fatigue, Lethargy, Tiredness, WearinessDepression AggravatedSerum Serotonin DecreasedPolydipsiaDyspnoea
ColitisFoetal Exposure During PregnancyMuscle CrampsExhaustion, Fatigue, Lethargy, Tiredness, WearinessHeadacheImpulsive BehaviourMouth Ulceration
AsthmaPremature BabyIrritabilityDizzinessDizzinessExtensive Interdialytic Weight GainLactic Acidosis
CellulitisDepressionIrregular Sleep PhaseInsomniaExhaustion, Fatigue, Lethargy, Tiredness, WearinessSweating FeverGastrooesophageal Reflux Disease
FibromyalgiaPleuritic PainSweating - ExcessiveSkin HyperpigmentationHungerPsychotic DisorderDiabetes Mellitus
Foetal Exposure During PregnancyAsthmaNauseaNauseaStatus Asthmaticus

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective72.73%
(8 of 11 people)
75.00%
(6 of 8 people)
Concerta is effective58.33%
(7 of 12 people)
62.50%
(5 of 8 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
MalaiseDyspnoea
FibromyalgiaStatus Asthmaticus
OverdosePallor
ColitisDilatation Ventricular
Pleuritic PainCondition Aggravated
AsthmaCyanosis
CellulitisDark Circles Under Eyes
Maternal Exposure During PregnancyCirculatory Collapse
Diabetes MellitusEpistaxis
Gastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseExcoriation

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/an/a71.43%
(5 of 7 people)
14.29%
(2 of 14 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
60.00%
(3 of 5 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
Concerta is effectiven/an/an/a57.14%
(4 of 7 people)
5.56%
(2 of 36 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
60.00%
(3 of 5 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/aDeathMalaiseJudgement ImpairedBlood Pressure IncreasedCellulitisNausea
Mouth UlcerationNasopharyngitisOverdoseColitisDehydration
DyspnoeaLoss Of ConsciousnessDehydrationOverdoseElectrolyte Imbalance
Gastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseExhibitionismConfusional StatePleuritic PainVomiting
Lactic AcidosisObsessive-compulsive DisorderSkin HyperpigmentationAsthmaConvulsion
Diabetes MellitusPolydipsiaFibromyalgiaHives
Status AsthmaticusSuspiciousnessArthralgiaHeadache
PallorCondition AggravatedDark Circles Under EyesDizziness
Psychotic DisorderDepression AggravatedSpousal AbuseExhaustion, Fatigue, Lethargy, Tiredness, Weariness
Maternal Exposure During PregnancyTired EyesHallucinations, Mixed

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Suboxone and Concerta?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Suboxone and Concerta
- support group for people who take Concerta
- support group for people who take Suboxone

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

  • Can i take naloxone with ocarbazpine
    wondering if the Naloxone mixed with the triliptal is doing this. Wondering if I can take the Buprenorphine with this medication
  • Is it okay to take 15mg. of remeron also known as mirtazapine (1 answer)
    is it safe to take suboxone with remeron because I am having a panic attack
  • Could ritalin cause temporary dementia in elderly
    I had a period of dementia that lasted for the better part of a day. I was brought to the hospital because they thought I was having a stroke. I have no memory of the event until I was in the hospital. I had been prescribed Ritalin because I have become unable to concentrate as well as I once could. That started about ten years ago and it was also had a very sudden onset, after a case of the flu.
    A Psychiatrist prescribed a dosage of Methylphenidate to be taken twice a day. I had a really hectic day ahead and thought that if I took both of them at once, it would help me get through the ordeal. I am under a lot of stress and thought it may help me cope. I have since thrown them out because the condition started about an hour after I took them according to family members. I don't remember the dosage, but I think it was a lower dosage because I had just started taking them on an "as needed basis." The doctor knew that I was going to use them for that purpose. I used them twice before (at the correct dosage) when I had to concentrate on paperwork, etc. They caused irregular heartbeat and a little bit of anxiety, but they did help me concentrate. The hospital tests ruled out a stroke or TIA. My thyroid level was off and the doctor at the hospital told me to stop the thyroid medication (Armour Thyroid) until I could see my family doctor and be retested. This all happened about five days ago. I'm back to what I consider normal now. Could that episode have been caused by the Ritalin?
    Thank you.
  • What is the reaction to vivitrol and ritalin?
    25 year old client in early recovery from opioid dependence takes ritalin and seroquel and wants to add vivitrol. What are the risks and side effects?
  • The appetite suppressant effects of ephedrine have worn off just starting concerta will it suppress my appetite?
    Just wondering if I have developed tolerance to ephedrine (quantified as a return of appetite) will the stimulant effects of concerta work on me

More questions for: Concerta, Suboxone

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Ears thundering after suboxone or any opiate
    Anyone notice the thundering in your ears after taking suboxone. Larger doses mostly and it actually happens with any opiate. It's a rumbling in the ears, I did read that hearing loss and opiates were connnected. hmmm
  • Ulcerative colitis from suboxone?
    Anyone else out there experiencing ulcerative colitis after multiple yearprescribed Suboxone? Suboxone stole a large portion of my life, and now I am considering going on a full-agonist analgesic until the buprenorphine bond has broken, and no more presence of it in my plasma. Insane!
  • Suboxone treatment may have caused my trichotillomania
    It's a long story of how I became addicted to opiates after 15+ years of chronic pain, but I decided to give up pain killers and try suboxone/subutex treatment. Shortly thereafter, I began pulling hair. First from my head, then when the bald spots became too obvious I started pulling from all over. It seemed to be triggered by stress or anxiety but not always. I did not make an association until recently, when I finally stopped the suboxone. It was two weeks of miserable withdrawal, much worse than from pain killers themselves, but I am finally out of the haze I'd be in all of that time, and I have no urge to pull hair whatsoever. I don't know how often the association of suboxone use and trichotillomania has been examined, but I wanted to share my experience in case anyone else is in a similar situation. Also, if you are considering starting suboxone treatment, don't. Withdrawal from opiates will lead to a few pretty rough days, but that's nothing compared to what you'll go through during suboxone withdrawal.
  • A life of depression and fatigue (1 response)
    1) Family history of depression, 2) Diagnosed depression 1964-not treated until 1973, 3) Worked in medical field 35 years, 4) Emergency on-call 24/7, 5) Hospital 15 times major depression, 6) Tried nearly all MAOI, TCA, SSRI, SNRI, and ECT. 7) 100% Disability in 1998 for depression. Now at age 70 I have dysthymia, chronic fatigue, COPD, and PTSD. My recommendation to younger people - do not over stress,
    do not smoke, avoid horrific or traumatic situations and try to find some enjoyment in life. If you have symptoms like mine seek early treatment put balance in your life. The often heard recommendations - get plenty of sleep, eat properly, learn to relax and avoid bad habits should not be ignored, they are critical to good physical and mental health.
  • A really bad day ritalin+orange juice
    I took Ritaline, then Orange juice. I couldn't do my exam at all...

More reviews for: Concerta, Suboxone

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (3 months ago):

  • Exposure to tempratures below 60 F causes itching and hives on back and legs

    Reply

  • From this study (6 months ago):

  • I had a small amount of the hyperpigmentation between the nose and mouth (mustache area) before starting any of the drugs listed above, however, I was on Methadone at the time. That was about 3 years ago. Over the last 2 years it has spread to my cheeks & chin as well. Basically I have darkened skin in the areas of the face that a beard would cover, which causes me to look like I have a beard and mustache.

    Reply

  • From this study (2 years ago):

  • No one else in family of 9 has dark circles. Only began noticing dark circles about a year after starting Atenolol.

    Reply

Post a new comment    OR    Read more comments

Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Concerta (methylphenidate hydrochloride) is often used to treat depression. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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