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Review: taking Suboxone and Depakote together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Suboxone and Depakote together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Depakote. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 51 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

Personalized health information: on eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA and social media since 1977. Our tools are free and anonymous. 66 million people have used us. 200+ peer-reviewed medical journals have referenced our original studies. Start now >>>

 

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What are the drugs

Suboxone has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal. (latest outcomes from 8,307 Suboxone users)

Depakote has active ingredients of divalproex sodium. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (latest outcomes from 30,964 Depakote users)

On May, 12, 2015: 51 people who take Suboxone, Depakote are studied

Suboxone, Depakote outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Depakote (divalproex sodium)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effectiven/a100.00%
(4 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/a
Depakote is effective0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
n/an/a66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective100.00%
(6 of 6 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
Depakote is effective40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
0.00%
(0 of 4 people)

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/an/a60.00%
(3 of 5 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a
Depakote is effectiven/an/an/a16.67%
(1 of 6 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
ConvulsionVomitingDysgeusiaPulmonary OedemaFrequent Headachesn/an/aDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
Oedema PeripheralOedema PeripheralHeadacheNervousnessVomitingPneumonia
LethargyHallucinationDrug Withdrawal SyndromePneumoniaFecal IncontinenceConvulsion
StressDeathDecreased AppetiteTension HeadacheDepression
HallucinationNightmaresCondition AggravatedSubstance AbuseHallucination
PneumoniaCryingOxygen Saturation DecreasedSuicidal Ideation
Tension HeadacheInsomniaSwelling FaceHeadache
Swelling FaceTachyphreniaErectile DisturbanceNausea
Oxygen Saturation DecreasedNegative ThoughtsPericardial Effusion
AnxietySuicidal IdeationInsomnia

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
PneumoniaDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
HeadacheConvulsion
Pulmonary MassBipolar Disorder
HaemoptysisDrug Dependence
HallucinationSuicidal Ideation
Antiphospholipid SyndromeAnxiety
DepressionDisturbance In Attention
Oedema PeripheralEuphoric Mood
DisorientationBlood Glucose Decreased
Withdrawal SyndromeNausea

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/aDeathDepressionSuicidal IdeationPneumoniaHypoacusisn/a
Drug DependenceNauseaHallucinationFall
Suicidal IdeationCryingPericardial EffusionLoss Of Consciousness
Drug Withdrawal SyndromeDrug Withdrawal SyndromePulmonary MassScab
Condition AggravatedAggressionHaemoptysisExcoriation
SomnolenceDysgeusiaAntiphospholipid SyndromeDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
VomitingBipolar DisorderDisorientationConvulsion
Frequent HeadachesCondition AggravatedOedema PeripheralBlood Glucose Decreased
SedationDepressionHeadacheDrug Dependence
Mental DisorderDepressionOedema Peripheral

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Get connected: join our support group of Suboxone and Depakote on

Do you take Suboxone and Depakote?

 

You are not alone! Join a related support group:
- support group for people who take Depakote
- support group for people who take Suboxone

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Depakote, Suboxone

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    It's a long story of how I became addicted to opiates after 15+ years of chronic pain, but I decided to give up pain killers and try suboxone/subutex treatment. Shortly thereafter, I began pulling hair. First from my head, then when the bald spots became too obvious I started pulling from all over. ...
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More reviews for: Depakote, Suboxone

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (5 days ago):

  • Small, flat red dots on arms, legs, and chest. Appeared suddenly after taking suboxone one night

    Reply

  • From this study (11 months ago):

  • I am waking you 4-5 times a week between 3-4 am crying and yelling.I have the same dream every night, detail for detail.it's always the same, I get a call to come to the hospital something to do with my husband. I go there and they don't say anything to me just walk me into a room and he is laying on a bed covered head to toe in a white sheet and his head is wrapped in several sheets. They never ask me to identify him or say a word to me but i know its him.wieirdest most scariest thing in my life. I literally wake up immediately and Ii'm crying, screaming no and calling for him, all sweaty. He gets me up and holi spent ds me and makes sure I see he is ok but th emotional and physical are taking its toll. I feel like something horrible is going t
    To happened to him
    Is this happening from a side affects from my meds or how should i handle this I'm to scared at nights sometimes bc I'm worried about having another of t

    Reply

    op_diom on Jul, 6, 2014:

    I had this happen to me all the time. I changed to taking my dosage of suboxone to once in the late morning lunch time period and once before I got to sleep. Taking it spread out during the day and near bedtime keeps your receptors sufficiently blocked all day and night so you don't start experiencing terrors at night due to withdrawal. Helped me tremendously and I can honestly say those night terrors I experienced during withdrawal and weaning periods were some of the most horrific experiences I have ever gone through in my entire life. One you start to wean off, cut down slivers each week or two -- take your time

    Reply

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Depakote (divalproex sodium) is often used to treat bipolar disorder. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

   

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