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Review: Suboxone and Effexor

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Effexor. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 178 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

Stay connected: join a mobile support group for people who take Suboxone and Effexor >>>

What are the drugs

Suboxone (latest outcomes from 8,224 users) has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal.

Effexor (latest outcomes from 54,972 users) has active ingredients of venlafaxine hydrochloride. It is often used in depression.

On Jul, 18, 2014: 178 people who take Suboxone, Effexor are studied

Suboxone, Effexor outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Effexor (venlafaxine hydrochloride)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective50.00%
(3 of 6 people)
87.50%
(7 of 8 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
62.50%
(5 of 8 people)
80.00%
(4 of 5 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/a
Effexor is effective0.00%
(0 of 4 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
42.86%
(3 of 7 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
36.36%
(4 of 11 people)
60.00%
(3 of 5 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
AbasiaSomnolenceDrug Withdrawal Syndrome NeonatalRoad Traffic AccidentFatigueFatigueWeight Gain PoorDepression
AphasiaIncreased Upper Airway SecretionDrug Withdrawal SyndromeConvulsionDrug Withdrawal SyndromeIrritabilityHeadacheFatigue
Psychomotor Skills ImpairedContusionDrug Exposure During PregnancyCryingMood SwingsInsomniaLethargyMalaise
Decreased AppetiteFallAngerDrug Withdrawal SyndromeSomnolenceDrug Withdrawal SyndromeLow Back PainCellulitis
FallDizzinessCartilage InjuryEmotional DisorderVomitingMalaiseCellulitisVomiting
Cardiac Failure CongestiveLower Respiratory Tract InfectionCostochondritisAngerCervix CarcinomaNauseaItchinessFall
Urinary Tract ObstructionMuscle InjuryAcid RefluxInjuryEmotional DisorderLethargyMemory ImpairmentInsomnia
AstheniaVertigoConvulsionTirednessDepressionBlurred VisionDrug AddictionOedema Peripheral
AnxietyCerebrovascular AccidentEmotional DisorderChest PainHeart AttackPersonality ChangeInsomniaSomnolence
Drug Withdrawal SyndromeOropharyngeal PainLow Back PainVentricular Septal DefectMemory ImpairmentMigraine

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective73.68%
(14 of 19 people)
61.54%
(8 of 13 people)
Effexor is effective36.36%
(8 of 22 people)
33.33%
(4 of 12 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
DepressionSomnolence
CellulitisNasopharyngitis
FatigueFatigue
Drug Withdrawal SyndromeRoad Traffic Accident
InsomniaInfluenza Like Illness
Chest PainDizziness
MalaiseCough
Oedema PeripheralFall
MigraineLower Respiratory Tract Infection
Intervertebral Disc ProtrusionContusion

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/an/a63.64%
(7 of 11 people)
46.15%
(12 of 26 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
Effexor is effectiven/an/an/a7.14%
(1 of 14 people)
30.43%
(7 of 23 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/aAttention Deficit/hyperactivity DisorderMalaiseConvulsionDepressionSuicidal IdeationDizziness
Post-traumatic Stress DisorderRoad Traffic AccidentSomnolenceCellulitisMemory ImpairmentMuscle Injury
Deep Vein ThrombosisGastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseDrug Withdrawal SyndromeGeneral Physical Health DeteriorationDyspnoeaLower Respiratory Tract Infection
Protein S DeficiencyDiabetes MellitusConstipationInfluenzaDrug Withdrawal SyndromeNasopharyngitis
Pulmonary EmbolismFatigueFatigueIntervertebral Disc ProtrusionFrustrationSomnolence
DepressionPulmonary EmbolismInsomniaDysphagiaFallVertigo
AnxietyPainEmotional DisorderChest PainHypoaesthesiaFall
Lactic AcidosisFeeling AbnormalArthralgiaFeeling AbnormalOropharyngeal Pain
Mouth UlcerationDepressionBone PainCardiac DisorderIncreased Upper Airway Secretion
Ovarian CystWithdrawal SyndromeBronchitisBipolar DisorderCerebrovascular Accident

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

You can also:

Get connected! Join a mobile support group:
- group for people who take Suboxone and Effexor
- group for people who take Effexor
- group for people who take Suboxone

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (10 months ago):

  • Discontinued medications 6 months ago. Symptoms began one year ago.

    Reply

  • From this study (1 year ago):

  • I OVER TAKE MY NUVIGIL CAN I DIE AN DOES IT MAKE MY SUBOXONE WEAR OFF MUCH FASTER

    Reply

    Jessica on Oct, 5, 2012:

    I was actualy wondering if suboxone made nuvigil not work. I was under the assumption that suboxone could counteract these type of meds. My doc didnt say anything of the sort but just wondering. It takes two doses of nuvigil to make a difference.

    Reply

    mel143 on Oct, 17, 2012:

    Yes it will. Nuvigil causes enzymes in the liver to degrade the suboxone much more quickley. I have been percribed both and I couldnt take the nuvigil with the suboxone anymore because the suboxone wouldnt work when I did.

    Reply

    keithkenpo on Apr, 7, 2013:

    My understanding is suboxone is taken subliminally so it does not go thru liver, i could be wrong though. If you can stop suboxone abruptly by using nuvigil it would be great.

    Reply

Post a new comment    OR    Read more comments

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Effexor (venlafaxine hydrochloride) is often used to treat depression. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

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