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Review: taking Suboxone and Omeprazole together

Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Suboxone and Omeprazole together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Suboxone and Omeprazole. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 64 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

 

 

 

 

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Suboxone and Omeprazole >>>

What are the drugs

Suboxone has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal. (latest outcomes from 8,295 Suboxone users)

Omeprazole has active ingredients of omeprazole. It is often used in gastroesophageal reflux disease. (latest outcomes from 92,839 Omeprazole users)

On Feb, 3, 2015: 64 people who take Suboxone, Omeprazole are studied

Suboxone, Omeprazole outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride)
- Omeprazole (omeprazole)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
n/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a
Omeprazole is effectiven/an/a100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
VomitingCondition Aggravatedn/aRoad Traffic AccidentAbdominal NeoplasmConvulsionn/aAbdominal Pain
NauseaDepressionShiveringHaematuriaInjuryVomiting
Oedema PeripheralMalaiseHeadachePainChildren And Weight ProblemsConvulsion
Abdominal Pain UpperDrug Withdrawal SyndromeNauseaOpen WoundNausea
Hallucination, AuditorySuicidal IdeationInsomniaOsteoarthritisCellulitis
Pulse Pressure DecreasedWeight IncreasedDiuretic EffectMobility DecreasedHidradenitis
SomnolenceIntervertebral Disc ProtrusionWater RetentionLoss Of ConsciousnessPain
Hallucination, VisualDrug Exposure During PregnancyAbortion SpontaneousPelvic FractureInjury
Confusional StateAbortion SpontaneousDrug Exposure During PregnancyLiver InjuryDepression
FallTendon RuptureInjuryMesenteric Vascular InsufficiencyRoad Traffic Accident

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Suboxone is effective50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
Omeprazole is effective75.00%
(3 of 4 people)
33.33%
(1 of 3 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
Abdominal PainPain
VomitingChest Pain
HidradenitisOesophagitis
CellulitisTremor
ConvulsionAbdominal Neoplasm
NauseaConfusional State
Oedema PeripheralInjury
Diabetes MellitusDepression
Road Traffic AccidentBack Pain
HyperglycaemiaDysarthria

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suboxone is effectiven/an/an/an/a25.00%
(2 of 8 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a
Omeprazole is effectiven/an/an/an/a12.50%
(1 of 8 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
n/an/an/aRoad Traffic AccidentAbdominal PainPulmonary EmbolismPainAphasia
MalaiseHidradenitisPelvic FractureInjurySomnolence
Mouth UlcerationCellulitisOsteoarthritisConvulsionCystitis
Lactic AcidosisNauseaPulmonary InfarctionFallDisorientation
Drug IneffectiveVomitingRoad Traffic AccidentHaematuriaLoss Of Consciousness
Gastrooesophageal Reflux DiseaseFaecal IncontinenceVena Cava InjuryAbdominal NeoplasmPulse Pressure Decreased
Diabetes MellitusHeadacheSmall Intestinal ObstructionDyskinesiaHypotension
Suicidal IdeationLethargyOpen WoundArthritisElectrolyte Imbalance
Drug Withdrawal SyndromeInsomniaMobility DecreasedRadiculopathyDehydration
Abortion SpontaneousSomnolenceLacerationTremorNausea

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Suboxone and Omeprazole?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Suboxone and Omeprazole
- support group for people who take Omeprazole
- support group for people who take Suboxone

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Omeprazole, Suboxone

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Prilosec and increased heart rate
    I took Prilosec for more than ten years for my GERD which actually kept getting worse in spite of my eventually taking two Prilosec a day. One day I decided to quit drinking milk in an attempt to lose weight. I have always been a heavy milk drinker, at least one large glass every day at dinner. To my surprise, my GERD symptoms almost disappeared. After that, I started avoiding all dairy and then found out I am actually lactose intolerant. I have completely stopped all dairy unless I take a lactase pill and I have been able to completely stop taking taking Prilosec and am GERD free entirely. Some other interesting side effects I notice are: 1.About a 10 pound weight loss and 2.About a 20 beat decrease in my resting heart rate which used to be around 80-85 and is now 60-65.
  • Ears thundering after suboxone or any opiate
    Anyone notice the thundering in your ears after taking suboxone. Larger doses mostly and it actually happens with any opiate. It's a rumbling in the ears, I did read that hearing loss and opiates were connnected. hmmm
  • Ulcerative colitis from suboxone?
    Anyone else out there experiencing ulcerative colitis after multiple yearprescribed Suboxone? Suboxone stole a large portion of my life, and now I am considering going on a full-agonist analgesic until the buprenorphine bond has broken, and no more presence of it in my plasma. Insane!
  • Suboxone treatment may have caused my trichotillomania
    It's a long story of how I became addicted to opiates after 15+ years of chronic pain, but I decided to give up pain killers and try suboxone/subutex treatment. Shortly thereafter, I began pulling hair. First from my head, then when the bald spots became too obvious I started pulling from all over. It seemed to be triggered by stress or anxiety but not always. I did not make an association until recently, when I finally stopped the suboxone. It was two weeks of miserable withdrawal, much worse than from pain killers themselves, but I am finally out of the haze I'd be in all of that time, and I have no urge to pull hair whatsoever. I don't know how often the association of suboxone use and trichotillomania has been examined, but I wanted to share my experience in case anyone else is in a similar situation. Also, if you are considering starting suboxone treatment, don't. Withdrawal from opiates will lead to a few pretty rough days, but that's nothing compared to what you'll go through during suboxone withdrawal.
  • Irregular heatbeat and prilosec
    I am 65 M and a long history of Moderate hypertension. I am overweight, out of shape. 15-20 years ago when I didn't take BP medicine I had occasional PVCs, heart skips a beat.

    Since I have been on Metoprolol (beta blocker) and Cozaar my BP is normal and heartbeat normal.
    I have been on that regimen 15-20 years.

    Now or in the last weeks or 2 I notice skipped beats and irregular, fast to slow and back on occasion

    Recently It was suggested I may have sleep apnea and was definitely diagnosed with bad acid reflux by an Ear nose and throat specialist.

    I was told to go on 2 OTC Prevacid/day for 3 months. I instead, since I had them, went on Prilosec-- slightly different.

    I have been on Prilosec 2 or so weeks maybe 3.
    It clicked in my mind today that maybe there is a connection.

    I have a pretty expensive pulse oximeter (electronic finger thingy) and I can actually see flat lines and skipped beats and strength of pulse. Oxygen is 90 to 94. Also I started taking aspirin out of fear

    Anyone else?

More reviews for: Omeprazole, Suboxone

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Suboxone (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride) is often used to treat opiate withdrawal. Omeprazole (omeprazole) is often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

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You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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