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Review: Zyprexa and Seroquel





Summary: drug interactions are reported among people who take Zyprexa and Seroquel together.

This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Zyprexa and Seroquel. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 7,736 people who take the same drugs from FDA and social media, and is updated regularly.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Zyprexa and Seroquel >>>

What are the drugs

Zyprexa has active ingredients of olanzapine. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (latest outcomes from Zyprexa 43,497 users)

Seroquel has active ingredients of quetiapine fumarate. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (latest outcomes from Seroquel 79,098 users)

On Dec, 3, 2014: 7,736 people who take Zyprexa, Seroquel are studied

Zyprexa, Seroquel outcomes

Drug combinations in study:
- Zyprexa (olanzapine)
- Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Zyprexa is effective12.50%
(1 of 8 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
20.00%
(1 of 5 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
100.00%
(2 of 2 people)
Seroquel is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
14.29%
(1 of 7 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
62.50%
(5 of 8 people)
20.00%
(1 of 5 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusDiabetes Mellitus
Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Cholesterol IncreasedWeight IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedPancreatitisPancreatitis
HyperglycaemiaBlood Cholesterol IncreasedWeight IncreasedPancreatitisObesityObesityBlood Cholesterol IncreasedWeight Increased
PyrexiaPancreatitisPancreatitisDiabetic KetoacidosisPancreatitisPancreatitisObesityBlood Cholesterol Increased
Psychotic DisorderHyperglycaemiaObesityWeight IncreasedWeight IncreasedBlood Triglycerides IncreasedRenal Failure ChronicHyperglycaemia
Neuroleptic Malignant SyndromeBlood Triglycerides IncreasedHyperglycaemiaObesityBlood Triglycerides IncreasedHyperlipidaemiaConvulsionObesity
Blood Triglycerides IncreasedHyperlipidaemiaDiabetic KetoacidosisBlood Triglycerides IncreasedHyperglycaemiaHyperglycaemiaHyperlipidaemiaDiabetic Ketoacidosis
Weight IncreasedObesityHypertensionHyperglycaemiaHypertensionWeight IncreasedDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlHypertension
HyperlipidaemiaDiabetic KetoacidosisBlood Triglycerides IncreasedHyperlipidaemiaHyperlipidaemiaDiabetic KetoacidosisDiabetic KetoacidosisBlood Triglycerides Increased

Drug effectiveness by gender :

FemaleMale
Zyprexa is effective50.00%
(6 of 12 people)
25.00%
(4 of 16 people)
Seroquel is effective46.15%
(6 of 13 people)
13.33%
(2 of 15 people)

Most common drug interactions by gender * :

FemaleMale
Diabetes MellitusDiabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
PancreatitisPancreatitis
Weight IncreasedWeight Increased
Blood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol Increased
ObesityHyperglycaemia
HyperglycaemiaDiabetic Ketoacidosis
Diabetic KetoacidosisObesity
HypertensionHypertension
Blood Triglycerides IncreasedBlood Triglycerides Increased

Drug effectiveness by age :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Zyprexa is effectiven/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
85.71%
(6 of 7 people)
0.00%
(0 of 12 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
25.00%
(3 of 12 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
Seroquel is effectiven/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)
71.43%
(5 of 7 people)
16.67%
(2 of 12 people)
0.00%
(0 of 6 people)
8.33%
(1 of 12 people)
0.00%
(0 of 3 people)

Most common drug interactions by age * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Diabetes MellitusWeight IncreasedWeight IncreasedDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes MellitusDiabetes Mellitus
PancreatitisAggressionDiabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes MellitusType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes MellitusConvulsionType 2 Diabetes MellitusWeight IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedBlood Cholesterol IncreasedPancreatitisWeight Increased
DeathTardive DyskinesiaAgitationBlood Cholesterol IncreasedObesityPancreatitisBlood Cholesterol IncreasedDeath
Diabetic KetoacidosisDizzinessSuicidal IdeationDiabetic KetoacidosisWeight IncreasedObesityWeight IncreasedAnxiety
Diabetic ComaDrug IneffectiveAggressionSuicidal IdeationPancreatitisWeight IncreasedHyperglycaemiaConfusional State
HyperglycaemiaHyperglycaemiaDiabetic KetoacidosisPancreatitisHyperglycaemiaHyperglycaemiaDiabetic NeuropathyTremor
Pancreatitis AcuteMetabolic DisorderAnxietyObesityBlood Triglycerides IncreasedBlood Triglycerides IncreasedNeuropathy PeripheralHyperglycaemia
Blood Cholesterol IncreasedDiabetes MellitusType 1 Diabetes MellitusHyperglycaemiaHypertensionDiabetes Mellitus Inadequate ControlObesityPyrexia
Weight IncreasedDyspnoeaAbnormal BehaviourPsychotic DisorderDiabetic KetoacidosisDiabetic KetoacidosisHypertensionNeuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you take Zyprexa and Seroquel?

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Zyprexa and Seroquel
- support group for people who take Seroquel
- support group for people who take Zyprexa

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Seroquel, Zyprexa

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Bipolar patient extremely violent on seraquel
    I have been diagnosed bipolar for over 10 years. 3 years ago I was taken off of topamax and my seraquel was upped to 300 mg from 100 because I was pregnant. I was very violent! Punching, breaking stuff, in jail, in the psych ward. Yes pregnancy and bipolar are not a perfect combination. I too thought it was the hormones. My husband and split several times over me punching him. We moved to a state cross country so there was no more family drama. Nothing worked! Over the last 3 years my life has been hell! I happen to run out of my seroquel (tg) it took 2 weeks to arrive. In that time my body went thru horrible withdrawals. I vowed I wouldn't take it any longer. I've been seraquel free for 2 months. I'm now on gabapentin and proud to say I have no anger issues! Not 1 punch has
    been thrown. I feel like a totally different person.
  • Seroquel and iron deficiency?
    I've been taking Seroquel for about four year, I have been having symptoms similar to hypothyroidism, and just found out I have an iron deficiency. The doctor said my platelets are smaller than average, and it is possible that my grandmother is anemic. But in trying to study Seroquel I kept finding things that made me wonder if Seroquel could be linked to iron deficiency.
  • Transition from mirtazapine to cymbalta (bipolar ii) 6 week duration taken in conjunction with seroquel, propranalol and implanon
    In early September I approached my Psychiatrist to report that I was having sleep paralysis episodes as well as insatiable appetite. I had put on about 20lb in the space of 6 months since the sleep paralysis started.

    My Psychiatrist opted to wean me off the Mirtazapine and onto Cymbalta. I have now been on 60mg of Cymbalta for about 4 weeks and completely titrated off the Mirtazapine.

    I have noted that since switching to Cymbalta that I no longer have the insatiable appetite, nor have I had any further sleep paralysis episodes (though I have had a brain MRI to rule out any physiological issues - yet to receive results).

    I have noticed that I have had mild to moderate rolling nausea with the Cymbalta and that I now have food aversions. Food does not interest me as much anymore and I find that certain foods (mostly processed snacks) are no longer palatable. I also find that I become full after much smaller meal portions.

    I have found that I can no longer drink wine or spirits because they now taste awful however I can still tolerate certain brands of beer. I also no longer enjoy drinking cola.

    I am also on the Implanon Implant. I have had this implant inserted for about 12 months and my cycles have been rather regular. Since starting the Cymbalta I have had some breakthrough bleeding yet my periods have not been as painful, though they have been heavier and longer.

    My Psychiatrist will commence titrating me off the Seroquel in about two weeks and onto Topamax as it is his belief it will be less sedating than the Seroquel and that it will hopefully help as a mood stabiliser, treat my migraines and allow me to come off the Propranolol. he also hopes that I am able to loose some of the weight gained since the sleep paralysis episodes started.

    As a side note regarding the Propranolol, I have naturally low blood pressure and I find while Propranalol is generally an effective migraine prophylactic, (I do get some breakthrough migraines) it does make my blood pressure even lower which leads to dizziness and faintness when I stand up too quickly from a recumbent position.
  • I have less pain from my trigeminal neuralgia when i'm manic.
    Has anyone had a relief of pain when they are manic?
  • Eczema and birth control-microgestin
    I started getting eczema over the last year and recently decided it may be from the birth control as well, which I started taking @ 2 months before I got the eczema and skin started breaking out...weight gain, etc. I am on singulair, westcort cream, moisture/kenalog, exederm cream, cerevue wash, cetaphil moisturizer, and started using the black soap which is apparently helping. I started a vegetarian diet and eat mainly the same foods daily to monitor anything for allergies. I stopped taking the pill 3 days ago and I am optimistic. I am hoping others have had positive experiences.

More reviews for: Seroquel, Zyprexa

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (1 week ago):

  • I have lost almost all memory while on these medications and I cannot remember that part of my life while on them I can only remember bits and pieces. I was on all this medication due to my drug induced psycosis and to stop my paranoia and wanting to harm myself and others. This was over 12 years ago and approx 4 years I have lost but happy to say that tis present day life is great.

    Reply

  • From this study (4 months ago):

  • i'm pretty much the most comlex case 4 psychiatrists, 3 psychologists, a nuero scientist/adult mood disorder specialised doctor, 3 gp's, 2 naturopaths and an adhd specialist have ever come accross. i'm basically a pharmacy on legs with over 32types of medications tried in 13 months including those i've mentioned above. i admitted myself into hospital (to get a team around me) for 3 weeks in the psych ward in july 2013 but was granted an agreed by patient/all the different types of doctors and nursing staff to b words) and 'what planet am i from (using a nurses exact words) because i'm soe released early as they had 'no lollies left to try' (using the head psych's exact words referring to prescription medications) anr how so rediculously med-resistant to all that could be tried. the night nurses were actually scare d of me, not by any violence or anything at all alike, but by my uncanny ability to be dosed so very very highly on so many potent medications and extreme combinations to no avail. i've had 9ver 25 blood tests, ultrasounds, brain imagery mri's, sleep disorders studies in hospital and numerous other forms of clinical testing to still be on the rollercoaster and the viscous cycle 13months later and i'm still in the same boat! it's been said way more than just a few times that i'm one hell of a case for the record books!

    Reply

  • From this study (11 months ago):

  • after taking these drugs I developed these disorders

    Reply

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Complete drug side effects:

On eHealthMe, Zyprexa (olanzapine) is often used to treat bipolar disorder. Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate) is often used to treat bipolar disorder. Find out below the conditions the drugs are used for, how effective they are, and any alternative drugs that you can use to treat those same conditions.

What is the drug used for and how effective is it:

Other drugs that are used to treat the same conditions:

NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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