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What could cause Dyslexia, Tremor, Dysphoria, Dystonia, Dry Mouth, Short-term Memory Loss, Crying for a 55-year old woman who takes Cymbalta, Dilacor Xr, Prevacid, Ambien, Crestor, Ativan, Trileptal, Clonazepam, Lamictal?





Summary: 8 female patients aged 55 (±5) who take the same drugs are studied.

This is a personalized study for a 55 year old female patient who has Neuropathy, Angina Pectoris, GERD, Sleep Disorder, Hypercholesterolemia, Stress and anxiety, Absence seizure, Restless Leg Syndrome, Seizure disorder. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports from FDA and social media.

What are the drugs

Cymbalta has active ingredients of duloxetine hydrochloride. It is often used in depression. (view latest outcomes from 49,275 users)

Dilacor xr has active ingredients of diltiazem hydrochloride. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Dilacor xr 755 users)

Prevacid has active ingredients of lansoprazole. It is often used in gastroesophageal reflux disease. (latest outcomes from Prevacid 40,810 users)

Ambien has active ingredients of zolpidem tartrate. It is often used in insomnia. (latest outcomes from Ambien 46,720 users)

Crestor has active ingredients of rosuvastatin calcium. It is often used in high blood cholesterol. (view latest outcomes from 60,032 users)

Ativan has active ingredients of lorazepam. It is often used in stress and anxiety. (latest outcomes from Ativan 35,203 users)

Trileptal has active ingredients of oxcarbazepine. It is often used in epilepsy. (latest outcomes from Trileptal 11,884 users)

Clonazepam has active ingredients of clonazepam. It is often used in stress and anxiety. (latest outcomes from Clonazepam 41,274 users)

Lamictal has active ingredients of lamotrigine. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (view latest outcomes from 40,593 users)

What are the conditions

Neuropathy (damage to nerves) can be treated by Gabapentin, Lyrica, Neurontin, Cymbalta, Amitriptyline Hydrochloride, Nortriptyline Hydrochloride. (latest reports from Neuropathy 5,090 patients)

Angina pectoris (chest pain due to ischemia of the heart muscle) can be treated by Ranexa, Isosorbide Mononitrate, Nitroglycerin, Amlodipine Besylate, Imdur, Bisoprolol Fumarate. (latest reports from Angina Pectoris 25,388 patients)

Gerd (gastro-oesophageal reflux disease) can be treated by Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix, Prilosec Otc. (latest reports from Gerd 10,551 patients)

Sleep disorder can be treated by Ambien, Trazodone Hydrochloride, Zolpidem Tartrate, Seroquel, Ambien Cr, Lunesta. (latest reports from Sleep Disorder 42,387 patients)

Hypercholesterolemia (high levels of cholesterol in the blood) can be treated by Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin Sodium, Zocor, Atorvastatin Calcium. (latest reports from Hypercholesterolemia 158,202 patients)

Stress and anxiety can be treated by Xanax, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Lexapro, Lorazepam, Ativan. (latest reports from Stress And Anxiety 195,268 patients)

Absence seizure (impairment of consciousness in epilepsy) can be treated by Keppra, Lamictal, Topamax, Depakote Er, Dilantin, Tegretol. (latest reports from Absence Seizure 131 patients)

Restless leg syndrome (a powerful urge to move your legs) can be treated by Mirapex, Requip, Ropinirole Hydrochloride, Pramipexole Dihydrochloride, Clonazepam, Gabapentin. (latest reports from Restless Leg Syndrome 16,008 patients)

Seizure disorder (disease of seizure related) can be treated by Lamictal, Keppra, Tegretol, Dilantin, Lamotrigine, Carbamazepine. (latest reports from Seizure Disorder 36,528 patients)

What are the symptoms

Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols) has been reported by people with depression, osteoporosis, pain, sleep disorder, high blood cholesterol.(latest reports from Dyslexia 287 patients)

Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body) has been reported by people with depression, multiple sclerosis, high blood pressure, pain, stress and anxiety.(latest reports from Tremor 70,421 patients)

Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life) has been reported by people with depression, stress and anxiety, pain, bipolar disorder, insomnia.(latest reports from Dysphoria 1,090 patients)

Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone) has been reported by people with indigestion, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic disorder.(latest reports from Dystonia 16,222 patients)

Dry mouth has been reported by people with high blood pressure, depression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, osteoporosis, high blood cholesterol.(latest reports from Dry mouth 30,429 patients)

Short-term memory loss has been reported by people with multiple sclerosis, depression, high blood pressure, pain, high blood cholesterol.(latest reports from Short-term memory loss 62,109 patients)

Crying has been reported by people with depression, quit smoking, stress and anxiety, multiple sclerosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.(latest reports from Crying 15,371 patients)

On Nov, 22, 2014: 8 females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta, Dilacor Xr, Prevacid, Ambien, Crestor, Ativan, Trileptal, Clonazepam, Lamictal are studied

Cymbalta, Dilacor Xr, Prevacid, Ambien, Crestor, Ativan, Trileptal, Clonazepam, Lamictal outcomes

Information of the patient in this study:

Age: 50

Gender: female

Conditions: Neuropathy, Angina Pectoris, GERD, Sleep Disorder, Hypercholesterolemia, Stress and anxiety, Absence seizure, Restless Leg Syndrome, Seizure disorder

Drugs taking:
- Cymbalta - 60MG (duloxetine hydrochloride): used for 1 - 2 years
- Dilacor Xr - 180MG (diltiazem hydrochloride): used for 6 - 12 months
- Prevacid - 30MG (lansoprazole): used for 2 - 5 years
- Ambien - 10MG (zolpidem tartrate): used for 1 - 2 years
- Crestor - 10MG (rosuvastatin calcium): used for 6 - 12 months
- Ativan - 1MG (lorazepam): used for 6 - 12 months
- Trileptal - 300MG (oxcarbazepine): used for 1 - 2 years
- Clonazepam - 2MG (clonazepam): used for 6 - 12 months
- Lamictal - 250MG (lamotrigine): used for 1 - 6 months

Drug interactions have: most severe dyslexia, most severe tremor, severe dysphoria, severe dystonia, most severe balance impaired nos, moderate dry mouth, most severe short-term memory loss, severe crying

eHealthMe real world results:

Comparison with this patient's adverse outcomes:

InteractionNumber of reports on eHealthMe
Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols)2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life)2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Balance Impaired Nos2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Dry Mouth2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Short-term Memory Loss2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)
Crying2 (25.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take the drugs)

(as an adverse outcome could be a symptom of a condition, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, regardless of which drug is taken, how many female HBP patients aged 50 (±5) have nausea)

Symptom (click a symptom for in-depth analysis)Number of reports on eHealthMe
Dyslexia in Neuropathy1 (0.36% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Dyslexia in Angina Pectoris1 (0.47% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Dyslexia in Gerd2 (0.11% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Dyslexia in Sleep Disorder1 (0.03% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Dyslexia in Hypercholesterolemia3 (0.03% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Dyslexia in Stress And Anxiety1 (0.01% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Dyslexia in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Dyslexia in Restless Leg Syndrome1 (0.07% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Dyslexia in Seizure Disorder2 (0.11% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Tremor in Neuropathy3 (1.08% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Tremor in Angina Pectoris4 (1.90% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Tremor in Gerd5 (0.27% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Tremor in Sleep Disorder137 (3.63% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Tremor in Hypercholesterolemia130 (1.27% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Tremor in Stress And Anxiety279 (2.98% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Tremor in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Tremor in Restless Leg Syndrome22 (1.55% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Tremor in Seizure Disorder47 (2.66% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Dysphoria in Neuropathy1 (0.36% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Dysphoria in Angina Pectoris1 (0.47% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Dysphoria in Gerd1 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Dysphoria in Sleep Disorder1 (0.03% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Dysphoria in Hypercholesterolemia1 (0.01% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Dysphoria in Stress And Anxiety4 (0.04% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Dysphoria in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Dysphoria in Restless Leg Syndrome2 (0.14% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Dysphoria in Seizure Disorder1 (0.06% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Dystonia in Neuropathy1 (0.36% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Dystonia in Angina Pectoris2 (0.95% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Dystonia in Gerd2 (0.11% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Dystonia in Sleep Disorder7 (0.19% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Dystonia in Hypercholesterolemia11 (0.11% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Dystonia in Stress And Anxiety13 (0.14% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Dystonia in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Dystonia in Restless Leg Syndrome1 (0.07% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Dystonia in Seizure Disorder2 (0.11% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Balance Impaired Nos in Neuropathy1 (0.36% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Balance Impaired Nos in Angina Pectoris1 (0.47% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Balance Impaired Nos in Gerd1 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Balance Impaired Nos in Sleep Disorder2 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Balance Impaired Nos in Hypercholesterolemia1 (0.01% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Balance Impaired Nos in Stress And Anxiety1 (0.01% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Balance Impaired Nos in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Balance Impaired Nos in Restless Leg Syndrome1 (0.07% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Balance Impaired Nos in Seizure Disorder1 (0.06% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Dry Mouth in Neuropathy6 (2.17% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Dry Mouth in Angina Pectoris2 (0.95% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Dry Mouth in Gerd13 (0.71% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Dry Mouth in Sleep Disorder43 (1.14% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Dry Mouth in Hypercholesterolemia124 (1.21% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Dry Mouth in Stress And Anxiety110 (1.17% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Dry Mouth in Absence Seizure1 (4.76% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Dry Mouth in Restless Leg Syndrome11 (0.77% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Dry Mouth in Seizure Disorder13 (0.74% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Short-term Memory Loss in Neuropathy3 (1.08% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Short-term Memory Loss in Angina Pectoris4 (1.90% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Short-term Memory Loss in Gerd20 (1.10% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Short-term Memory Loss in Sleep Disorder170 (4.51% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Short-term Memory Loss in Hypercholesterolemia327 (3.19% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Short-term Memory Loss in Stress And Anxiety336 (3.59% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Short-term Memory Loss in Absence Seizure2 (9.52% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Short-term Memory Loss in Restless Leg Syndrome51 (3.59% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Short-term Memory Loss in Seizure Disorder60 (3.40% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)
Crying in Neuropathy3 (1.08% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Neuropathy)
Crying in Angina Pectoris1 (0.47% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Angina pectoris)
Crying in Gerd3 (0.16% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Gerd)
Crying in Sleep Disorder48 (1.27% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Sleep disorder)
Crying in Hypercholesterolemia53 (0.52% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Hypercholesterolemia)
Crying in Stress And Anxiety142 (1.52% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Stress and anxiety)
Crying in Absence Seizure2 (9.52% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Absence seizure)
Crying in Restless Leg Syndrome12 (0.85% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Restless leg syndrome)
Crying in Seizure Disorder3 (0.17% of females aged 50 (±5) who have Seizure disorder)

(as an adverse outcome could be a side effect of a drug, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, how many female Aspirin users aged 50 (±5) have nausea)

Side effect (click a side effect for in-depth analysis)Number of reports on eHealthMe
Dyslexia in Cymbalta2 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Dyslexia in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Dyslexia in Prevacid1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Dyslexia in Ambien1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Dyslexia in Crestor2 (0.04% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Dyslexia in Ativan1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Dyslexia in Trileptal1 (0.09% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Dyslexia in Clonazepam1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Dyslexia in Lamictal2 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Tremor in Cymbalta264 (3.10% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Tremor in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Tremor in Prevacid119 (2.39% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Tremor in Ambien204 (3.18% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Tremor in Crestor70 (1.54% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Tremor in Ativan171 (3.80% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Tremor in Trileptal30 (2.58% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Tremor in Clonazepam182 (3.22% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Tremor in Lamictal128 (2.98% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Dysphoria in Cymbalta10 (0.12% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Dysphoria in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Dysphoria in Prevacid3 (0.06% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Dysphoria in Ambien3 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Dysphoria in Crestor1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Dysphoria in Ativan1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Dysphoria in Trileptal2 (0.17% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Dysphoria in Clonazepam3 (0.05% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Dysphoria in Lamictal8 (0.19% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Dystonia in Cymbalta15 (0.18% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Dystonia in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Dystonia in Prevacid6 (0.12% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Dystonia in Ambien12 (0.19% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Dystonia in Crestor2 (0.04% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Dystonia in Ativan7 (0.16% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Dystonia in Trileptal2 (0.17% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Dystonia in Clonazepam42 (0.74% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Dystonia in Lamictal7 (0.16% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Balance Impaired Nos in Cymbalta2 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Balance Impaired Nos in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Balance Impaired Nos in Prevacid6 (0.12% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Balance Impaired Nos in Ambien8 (0.12% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Balance Impaired Nos in Crestor1 (0.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Balance Impaired Nos in Ativan9 (0.20% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Balance Impaired Nos in Trileptal6 (0.52% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Balance Impaired Nos in Clonazepam13 (0.23% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Balance Impaired Nos in Lamictal11 (0.26% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Dry Mouth in Cymbalta139 (1.63% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Dry Mouth in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Dry Mouth in Prevacid103 (2.07% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Dry Mouth in Ambien103 (1.61% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Dry Mouth in Crestor39 (0.86% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Dry Mouth in Ativan43 (0.95% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Dry Mouth in Trileptal17 (1.46% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Dry Mouth in Clonazepam68 (1.20% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Dry Mouth in Lamictal43 (1.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Short-term Memory Loss in Cymbalta342 (4.02% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Short-term Memory Loss in Dilacor Xr1 (2.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Short-term Memory Loss in Prevacid146 (2.93% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Short-term Memory Loss in Ambien341 (5.32% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Short-term Memory Loss in Crestor87 (1.92% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Short-term Memory Loss in Ativan166 (3.68% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Short-term Memory Loss in Trileptal54 (4.64% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Short-term Memory Loss in Clonazepam198 (3.50% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Short-term Memory Loss in Lamictal191 (4.44% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)
Crying in Cymbalta142 (1.67% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Cymbalta)
Crying in Dilacor Xr2 (5.00% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Dilacor xr)
Crying in Prevacid41 (0.82% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Prevacid)
Crying in Ambien73 (1.14% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ambien)
Crying in Crestor20 (0.44% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Crestor)
Crying in Ativan35 (0.78% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Ativan)
Crying in Trileptal22 (1.89% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Trileptal)
Crying in Clonazepam78 (1.38% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Clonazepam)
Crying in Lamictal49 (1.14% of females aged 50 (±5) who take Lamictal)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Cymbalta is effectiven/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/a
Dilacor Xr is effectiven/an/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/a
Prevacid is effectiven/an/an/an/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a
Ambien is effectiven/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/a
Crestor is effectiven/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/a
Ativan is effectiven/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/a
Trileptal is effectiven/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/a
Clonazepam is effectiven/an/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/a
Lamictal is effectiven/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
n/aDry MouthDry MouthDry MouthDry Mouthn/an/aType 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Short-term Memory LossShort-term Memory LossShort-term Memory LossShort-term Memory LossPresbyopia (condition in which the lens of the eye loses its ability to focus, making it difficult to see objects up close)
CryingCryingCryingCryingConjunctival Abrasion (injury to outer surface of eye)
Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life)Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)Pyrexia (fever)
Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols)Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)Schizoaffective Disorder (a mental disorder characterized by disordered thought)
Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life)Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life)Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols)Dysphoria (generalized dissatisfaction with life)Tendonitis (a condition that causes pain and swelling of tendons)
Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols)Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)Dyslexia (disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols)Otitis Externa (external ear infection)
Restless Legs Syndrome (a powerful urge to move your legs)
Neuropathy Peripheral (surface nerve damage)
Exostosis (formation of new bone on the surface of a bone)

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

You can also:

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who have Absence Seizure
- support group for people who have Angina Pectoris
- support group for people who have GERD
- support group for people who have Hypercholesterolemia
- support group for people who have Neuropathy
- support group for people who have Restless Leg Syndrome
- support group for people who have Seizure Disorder
- support group for people who have Sleep Disorder
- support group for people who have Stress And Anxiety
- support group for people who have Crying
- support group for people who have Dry Mouth
- support group for people who have Dyslexia
- support group for people who have Dysphoria
- support group for people who have Dystonia
- support group for people who have Short-term Memory Loss
- support group for people who have Tremor
- support group for people who take Ambien
- support group for people who take Ativan
- support group for people who take Clonazepam
- support group for people who take Crestor
- support group for people who take Cymbalta
- support group for people who take Dilacor Xr
- support group for people who take Lamictal
- support group for people who take Prevacid
- support group for people who take Trileptal

Recent conversations of related support groups:

  • Support group for people who take Cymbalta
    Now found out I have incompetent vein in leg which may be part of the problem had cystocopy and found cysts in kidney, then developed hypertension but no one will diagnose the pain. Now decided it is the same as diabetic neuropathy but as gp and consultant point out I am a long way from being diabetic with perfect blood glucose so thinks it's just guessing and hope

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: Absence seizure, Angina Pectoris, Crying, Dry Mouth, Dyslexia, Dysphoria, Dystonia, GERD, Hypercholesterolemia, Neuropathy, Restless Leg Syndrome, Seizure disorder, Short-term Memory Loss, Sleep Disorder, Stress and anxiety, Tremor

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  • Percocet and memory loss
    A close friend of mine has been using prescription Percocet for 5 to 6 years. Her MD first prescribed the lowest dosage possible to be taken 3 to 4 times daily for pain. I am aware that this medication frequently needs to be increased because it will become less effective. I don't know how many times he has increased the dosage but it has been many times. I believe now she is taking the highest dosage of it up to four to six times daily and six tablets at a time. I have made several attempts to tell her the information I know about Percocet and to have her to ask her MD about her now short and long term memory problems. Her response is to shout at me, telling me she needs that much for pain and to mind my own business when I tell her about the negative side effects I see, especially her daily and hourly memory problems. She has also said she has no reason to speak to her doctor about memory problems. I think that is because she fears he might lower the dosage. My concern about her poor memory only causes her to tell me I am the one with a bad memory, even though the only pain meds I infrequently take are OTC ones. According to my MD, I have been told my memory for my age of 63 is perfectly fine and better than most for my age. Also I take no medications with the side effects that cause memory problems. In addition when my MD prescribes new medication I always read the info that accompanies them, do research online and pay attention to all warnings and side effect info. The few times I have had side effects they have only been GI problems and I have consulted my MD regarding those and work with my MD for an alternative medication. My friend NEVER EVER reads any of the accompanying material that comes with her prescriptions. Also she never looks up her medications online to get additional information, including possible side effects. I worry about her very much and fear she now has an addiction to Percocet. Several years ago she asked her MD for Chantix to stop smoking, never reading the info supplied with the prescription. I urged to read the info and side effects. She declined, telling me she knew what she was doing. After two weeks of using Chantix she had a mental break down and ended up on the psych ward of our local hospital for 3 weeks. That medication was the first that began to cause her to have memory problems. She accepted that fact for about a month then dismissed it claiming her memory problems were over. They weren't because she was still taking Percocet. I understand no one wants to be told by a friend they suspect that person has memory problems, but I haven't done so to be mean or cruel, but only out of great love and concern. At this point with all the Percocet she takes daily she really is at a level to be considered an addict and I fear soon she will convince her MD to increase the dosage because it no longer controls her pain. I've written this review as a cautionary tale to inform others to be vigilant with their family, friends and loved ones as Percocet can and does cause short and long term memory loss. Although all my efforts to assist and speak to my friend have failed, please don't give up on those in your life who you notice are experiencing memory loss signs that take Percocet. If possible speak to them or their MD. Oh, and be prepared to be yelled at that you are the one with memory problems or to be told to mind your own business. And please, please read the information that accompanies all of your medications.
  • Cymbalta side effects
    Starting Cymbalta, side effects were dizzy,felt drugged. Helped with Arthritis pain. About six weeks after i started i developed rectal bleeding.Doctor had me stop Cymbalta and use Tramadol as needed for withdrawal.
  • Panic after using flonase
    I was diagnosed with nasal polyps and put on Flonase (a steroid nose spray). It worked well to dry up post-nasal drip but I ended up with a bad case of panic and fear. I had overcome episodes of these nervous disorders but the Flonase brought it all back. I still suffer from panic even though I stopped the Flonase months ago. I had a bad attack on a bridge and also inside a grocery store. Personnel had to take me to the store office to calm me down. I am nearly agoraphobic now. I do go out alone but try to avoid after-dark. My life has been turned into daily dread of another attack. To think that I was more than ten years FREE of panic until I took the Flonase makes me feel so regretful that I ever took that stuff. It should be banned as there is enough evidence to do so from many people who now suffer debilitating and recurring panic.
  • Low potasium and mood
    While being treated for cancer about 3 years ago and thus taking a number of blood tests, I was diagnosed with low potassium level and prescribed a regular dosage. I had noticed that when I forgot to take my potassium pills, I soon began to feel more depressed than usual and to feel anxious. Taking the ills soon alleviated these symptoms. (I have had depression for most of my life but long ago decided against taking any of the anti-depression Rx pills because I disliked their side effects, especially on my ability to think clearly.) Very recently I finally got around to looking on the Internet to see whether low potassium was associated with mood disorders _ and I found that it was. This site apparently didn't study anyone my age (I'm 78), so I decided to offer these comments. I have at least one grandchild who has been formally diagnosed with depression, and one who is ADHD. Before finding that the relationship of mood and low potassium was formally known, I had suggested to their parent in a low-key way that perhaps she and they should check with their doctors about their potassium levels. Now I'm quite sure that is something they and their doctors should consider. Meanwhile, I am glad to have found formal study of what had been to me only an anecdotal kind of belief that the two were linked. More importantly, in all my years of doctor visits, no doctor and no psychologist has ever mentioned this link to me. Therefore, I hope that somehow this link is brought more to the forefront of medical attention.

More reviews for: Absence seizure, Angina Pectoris, Crying, Dry Mouth, Dyslexia, Dysphoria, Dystonia, GERD, Hypercholesterolemia, Neuropathy, Restless Leg Syndrome, Seizure disorder, Short-term Memory Loss, Sleep Disorder, Stress and anxiety, Tremor

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (3 weeks ago):

  • I am a 48 yr old female diagnosed with PTSD, bipolar 2, BPD, histrionic suicidal idealation and a mess!!!

    Things were going well in therapy and with my Dr. over the past 2 years on the above "cocktail" MINUS the Latuda and Lexapro.

    I have had 3 very serious suicide attempts, all prior to the Tegretol /Prozac regime.

    I do not want to change meds! Prior to the Tegretol, Klonopin , Lamictal , Prozac, Trazodone routine, I had made 3 very serious suicide attempts. The last leaving me with liver and kidney disease.

    I've recently been left with two tragic yet situational on sets. So against my desire, I agreed to omit Prozac and replace with Lexapro and add Latuda, replacing Tegretol.

    I have not been this unbalanced for YEARS! I know my triggers with suicide and believe that is the only reason I'm still alive. I HAD NOT THOUGHT ABOUT suicide for EIGHT YEARS!

    Crying all the time, don't eat or sleep for sometimes, up to four days! I'm so tired, I just cry more from frustration of not being able to sleep.

    I see my therapist tomorrow, but am on the "call" list for my Dr.

    With the holidays among us, I do not nor do I think I can make it on these meds.

    Can you PLEASE TELL ME if you know and I wasn't told, the, if any benefits will come forth? I know we are all different and I do trust my Md. Just not this time. Please, please help. Thank you.

    Reply

  • From this study (1 month ago):

  • peanuts on Mar, 31, 2010:

    my friend is suffering from rhumatory arthertis.and is currenty taking cocaine. oxy cotin,prestine, wellbutrim, predisone 10mg what side effects should she expect ?????

    Reply

    mtntexas on May, 11, 2013:

    Just ask John Belushi

    Reply

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