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Lodine, Lexapro, Lisinopril, Hydrochlorothiazide, Vyvanse for a 60-year old woman





Summary: 2,073 female patients aged 60 (±5) who take the same drugs are studied.

This is a personalized study for a 60 year old female patient who has Arthritis, Depression, High blood pressure, ADD. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports from FDA and social media.

What are the drugs

Lodine has active ingredients of etodolac. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from Lodine 2,962 users)

Lexapro has active ingredients of escitalopram oxalate. It is often used in depression. (latest outcomes from Lexapro 39,406 users)

Lisinopril has active ingredients of lisinopril. It is often used in high blood pressure. (view latest outcomes from 99,129 users)

Hydrochlorothiazide has active ingredients of hydrochlorothiazide. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Hydrochlorothiazide 61,953 users)

Vyvanse has active ingredients of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. It is often used in depression. (view latest outcomes from 7,822 users)

What are the conditions

Arthritis (form of joint disorder that involves inflammation of one or more joints) can be treated by Celebrex, Meloxicam, Mobic, Diclofenac Sodium, Naproxen, Ibuprofen. (latest reports from Arthritis 56,649 patients)

Depression can be treated by Zoloft, Cymbalta, Prozac, Lexapro, Wellbutrin Xl, Celexa. (latest reports from Depression 254,062 patients)

High blood pressure can be treated by Lisinopril, Atenolol, Amlodipine Besylate, Norvasc, Ramipril, Hydrochlorothiazide. (latest reports from High Blood Pressure 328,584 patients)

Add (attention deficit disorder-difficult to define) can be treated by Vyvanse, Concerta, Adderall 20, Adderall 30, Ritalin, Adderall Xr 30. (latest reports from Add 34,511 patients)

On Nov, 21, 2014: 2,073 females aged 56 (±5) who take Lodine, Lexapro, Lisinopril, Hydrochlorothiazide, Vyvanse are studied

Lodine, Lexapro, Lisinopril, Hydrochlorothiazide, Vyvanse outcomes

Information of the patient in this study:

Age: 56

Gender: female

Conditions: Arthritis, Depression, High blood pressure, ADD

Drugs taking:
- Lodine - 500MG (etodolac): used for < 1 month
- Lexapro - EQ 10MG BASE (escitalopram oxalate): used for 1 - 6 months
- Lisinopril - 5MG (lisinopril): used for 2 - 5 years
- Hydrochlorothiazide - 25MG (hydrochlorothiazide): used for 2 - 5 years
- Vyvanse - 40MG (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate): used for 1 - 6 months

eHealthMe real world results:

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Lodine is effectiven/a50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/an/an/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/a
Lexapro is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
60.00%
(3 of 5 people)
66.67%
(4 of 6 people)
100.00%
(3 of 3 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
Lisinopril is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
66.67%
(2 of 3 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
50.00%
(3 of 6 people)
53.33%
(8 of 15 people)
37.50%
(3 of 8 people)
66.67%
(4 of 6 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
Hydrochlorothiazide is effective40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
25.00%
(1 of 4 people)
50.00%
(2 of 4 people)
40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
50.00%
(5 of 10 people)
28.57%
(2 of 7 people)
40.00%
(2 of 5 people)
n/a
Vyvanse is effective0.00%
(0 of 2 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
50.00%
(1 of 2 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
DepressionRenal Failure Acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)PresyncopeNausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)DepressionCryingBreast Cancer MetastaticNausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
Blood Pressure IncreasedEmotional DisorderBlood Pressure Systolic IncreasedRenal Failure Acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)AnxietyInsomnia (sleeplessness)Abdominal Pain UpperPain
Hyponatraemia (abnormally low level of sodium in the blood; associated with dehydration)Cardiac Failure CongestiveInfluenza Like IllnessPancreatitis (inflammation of pancreas)Headache (pain in head)Coronary Artery Disease (plaque building up along the inner walls of the arteries of the heart, which narrows the arteries and restricts blood flow to the heart)DepressionAnxiety
Angioedema (rapid swelling of the dermis)Wheezing (a high-pitched whistling sound made while you breath)PainCoughInsomnia (sleeplessness)AnxietyNeurogenic Bladder (the normal function of the bladder is to store and empty urine in a coordinated, controlled fashion)Dizziness
Grand Mal Convulsion (a type of generalized seizure that affects the entire brain)Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)Red Blood Cell Sedimentation Rate IncreasedDiverticulitis (digestive disease which involves the formation of pouches (diverticula) within the bowel wall)Pain In ExtremityOesophageal PainFatigue (feeling of tiredness)
Breast CancerPalpitations (feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing)Coronary Artery Occlusion (complete obstruction of blood flow in a coronary artery)Post-traumatic Stress DisorderGastrooesophageal Reflux Disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)IrritabilityOsteopenia (a condition where bone mineral density is lower than normal)Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
Breast Cancer MetastaticMyocardial Infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)Intervertebral Disc Degeneration (spinal disc degeneration)Lung Infiltration (a substance that normally includes fluid, inflammatory exudates or cells that fill a region of lung)Large Intestine Perforation (hole in large intestine)Sensory Disturbance (sense disturbance)Meniscus Lesion (lesion of a crescent-shaped piece of cartilage between the femur and the tibia)Headache (pain in head)
Headache (pain in head)Pancreatitis (inflammation of pancreas)Sinusitis (inflammation of sinus)Weight IncreasedPancreatitis (inflammation of pancreas)OverdosePollakiuria (abnormally frequent passage of relatively small quantities or urine)Diarrhoea
Blood Creatinine IncreasedArthralgia (joint pain)Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe)Paraesthesia (sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect)Blood DisorderNervousnessGastrooesophageal Reflux Disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)Oedema Peripheral (superficial swelling)
Oedema Peripheral (superficial swelling)DizzinessFeeling AbnormalPancreatic Carcinoma (pancreatic cancer)Gait DisturbanceDepressionFeeling AbnormalVomiting

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

You can also:

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who have ADD
- support group for people who have Arthritis
- support group for people who have Depression
- support group for people who have High Blood Pressure
- support group for people who take Hydrochlorothiazide
- support group for people who take Lexapro
- support group for people who take Lisinopril
- support group for people who take Lodine
- support group for people who take Vyvanse

Recent conversations of related support groups:

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: ADD, Arthritis, Depression, High blood pressure

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Hydrochlorothiazide made me pour sweat
    Hydroclorothiazide made me absolutely pour sweat for two years. My doctors could not find out what was causing the problem. It took little exertion for me to start dripping sweat. My hair would be absolutely soaked...especially in the summer, but if I was cleaning house in the winter also. I finally did my own research and proposed to my doctor that HCTZ was the problem. He did not agree with me, but agreed to let me go off of it for a short time. The profuse sweating stopped almost immediately.
  • The zoloft/vyvanse concoction ruined my life.
    I started taking these drugs about two months ago. I am diagnosed ADHD by a psychiatrist. I received these medications from a doctor whom I know and is married to a friend my wife. She, the doctor, gave them to me from her personal medications in a plastic baggy. I was given loose instructions for taking these on a piece of paper. I was never given the paperwork with warning signs. 10 days after starting these medications, I attacked my wife and am now separated. I am barred from seeing her and my daughter by means of a Victims Protective Order. I am a normally nonviolent person. Most who know me call me a peacemaker...a pacifist. I am still horrified by the events of that night. 15 seconds changed my life forever. I hope and pray my story helps others. Don't be naïve, as I was, when given medications. Ask questions.
  • Avoid lisinopril or any ace inhibitor
    This was the only drug I was taking other than low-dose aspirin 3x/week.
    Within 2 days I began coughing, as though something was deep in my lungs; became long severe coughing fits than threw out my back, sore all over. Then began runny nose, exhaustion, occasional mild chest pain. Not connecting the dots, after a month of this I returned to my dr., who prescribed an antibiotic and inhaler, saying I had asthma! After a week starting feeling worse, sore throat and sore lungs from coughing, in bed from exhaustion.
    After reading on-line about identical symptoms from LISINOPRIL, I immediately stopped it; now, 2 weeks later I am beginning to feel better -- cough much better. I am hoping I will be one of the lucky ones who does not have the cough continue. By the way, this drug reduced my bp from 140/100 to 110/80 BUT I'd rather have high bp than take this poison.
    Now I learn than many deaths have resulted from use of Lisinopril. Had this drug caused my death, no one would know my story as I have no relatives to tell it; am assuming many unreported have died and of course are not able to go on-line and tell their story post-death!
    All I can do is ask WHY is this drug allowed to be sold -- even stranger, in my case the drugstore is giving this poison away at no charge -- a first; but WHY?
  • Low potasium and mood
    While being treated for cancer about 3 years ago and thus taking a number of blood tests, I was diagnosed with low potassium level and prescribed a regular dosage. I had noticed that when I forgot to take my potassium pills, I soon began to feel more depressed than usual and to feel anxious. Taking the ills soon alleviated these symptoms. (I have had depression for most of my life but long ago decided against taking any of the anti-depression Rx pills because I disliked their side effects, especially on my ability to think clearly.) Very recently I finally got around to looking on the Internet to see whether low potassium was associated with mood disorders _ and I found that it was. This site apparently didn't study anyone my age (I'm 78), so I decided to offer these comments. I have at least one grandchild who has been formally diagnosed with depression, and one who is ADHD. Before finding that the relationship of mood and low potassium was formally known, I had suggested to their parent in a low-key way that perhaps she and they should check with their doctors about their potassium levels. Now I'm quite sure that is something they and their doctors should consider. Meanwhile, I am glad to have found formal study of what had been to me only an anecdotal kind of belief that the two were linked. More importantly, in all my years of doctor visits, no doctor and no psychologist has ever mentioned this link to me. Therefore, I hope that somehow this link is brought more to the forefront of medical attention.
  • Suboxone treatment may have caused my trichotillomania
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More reviews for: ADD, Arthritis, Depression, High blood pressure

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

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