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Metoprolol Tartrate, Amitriptyline Hydrochloride for a 55-year old woman





Summary: 221 female patients aged 55 (±5) who take the same drugs are studied.

This is a personalized study for a 55 year old female patient who has GERD. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports from FDA and social media.

What are the drugs

Metoprolol tartrate has active ingredients of metoprolol tartrate. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Metoprolol tartrate 40,420 users)

Amitriptyline hydrochloride has active ingredients of amitriptyline hydrochloride. It is often used in migraine. (latest outcomes from Amitriptyline hydrochloride 7,150 users)

What are the conditions

Pulse - bounding (latest reports from Pulse - Bounding 37 patients)

Gerd (gastro-oesophageal reflux disease) can be treated by Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix, Prilosec Otc. (latest reports from Gerd 18,828 patients)

On Dec, 28, 2014: 221 females aged 55 (±5) who take Metoprolol Tartrate, Amitriptyline Hydrochloride are studied

Metoprolol Tartrate, Amitriptyline Hydrochloride outcomes

Information of the patient in this study:

Age: 55

Gender: female

Conditions: Pulse - Bounding, GERD

Drugs taking:
- Metoprolol Tartrate - 25MG (metoprolol tartrate): used for 1 - 6 months
- Amitriptyline Hydrochloride - 25MG (amitriptyline hydrochloride): used for < 1 month

eHealthMe real world results:

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Metoprolol Tartrate is effectiven/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/a
Amitriptyline Hydrochloride is effectiven/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)Septic Shock (shock due to blood infection)n/aRapid Heart Beatn/aSinus Tachycardia (a heart rhythm with elevated rate of impulses originating from the sinoatrial node)Kidney Crystallisation (crystallized minerals that become lodged in kidney tissue)Chest Pain
Acidosis (build-up of carbon dioxide in the blood)Intestinal Ischaemia (decreased supply of oxygenated blood to the intestines)Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)Pain
Sopor (sleep)Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (systemic activation of blood coagulation)Electrocardiogram T Wave InversionAnxiety
Suicide AttemptHepatorenal Syndrome (renal failure in patients with advanced chronic liver disease)Sweating Increased (excess sweating)Cardiac Failure Congestive
Tachycardia (a heart rate that exceeds the range of 100 beats/min)Multi-organ Failure (multisystem organ failure)Arthralgia (joint pain)
Sinus Tachycardia (a heart rhythm with elevated rate of impulses originating from the sinoatrial node)Hepatic Encephalopathy (spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities in patients with liver failure)Pain In Extremity
Electrocardiogram T Wave InversionAcute Hepatic FailureInjury
Multiple Drug Overdose IntentionalPruritus Generalised (generalized itching)Emotional Distress
Intentional OverdoseRash Maculo-papular (red area on the skin that is covered with small confluent bumps)Pyrexia (fever)
Sweating Increased (excess sweating)Dizziness

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

You can also:

You are not alone! Join a related mobile support group:
- support group for people who have GERD
- support group for people who take Amitriptyline Hydrochloride
- support group for people who take Metoprolol Tartrate

Can you answer these questions (Ask a question):

More questions for: GERD, Pulse - Bounding

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Terrible excessive sweating from hydrochlorothiazide
    I guess I fit the profile of who gets excessive sweating from HCTZ. I am a 65 year old female and suffered from excessive sweating for two years. With just very little exertion, I would pour sweat from the top of my head. It would run into my face and all over my hair. My hair would be ringing wet. I had heavy perspiration in the groin area and down my back also. I had to change clothing 2-3 times a day and wash up or shower that many times also. The doctor tried changing my Cymbalta and put me on Wellbutrin instead. It did absolutely no good. I went off the wellbutrin and back onto the Cymbalta. I did some research and saw that HCTZ could cause excessive sweating. Both my doctor and my pharmacist said that they had never heard of that. I went off the HCTZ, and my sweating stopped almost immediately. My doctor and my pharmacist were very surprised. I'm one of those people who frequently have different reactions to drugs than are typical. If you're having excessive perspiration and are on HCTZ, try going off of it. It just may be the culprit!
  • Hydrochlorothiazide made me pour sweat
    Hydroclorothiazide made me absolutely pour sweat for two years. My doctors could not find out what was causing the problem. It took little exertion for me to start dripping sweat. My hair would be absolutely soaked...especially in the summer, but if I was cleaning house in the winter also. I finally did my own research and proposed to my doctor that HCTZ was the problem. He did not agree with me, but agreed to let me go off of it for a short time. The profuse sweating stopped almost immediately.
  • Ranitidine is bad juju
    Used 3-5 times per week for about 1 1/2 years. Noticed:
    shortness of breath
    contstricted throat
    bloating
    chest pain/pressure
    heart palpatations
    dryness - more so than usual

    I quit taking it and felt much better within 2-3 days.
  • Amitriptyline involuntary eye movements
    I've began having sparatic involuntary eye movements a few days after I started taking amitriptyline. It's not faint either, it's like my eye is having a seizure, emabrassing. Just wanted to share.
  • Loss of voice and stomach issues
    Prescribed to take 2 - 300 mg tablets of Clindamycin prior to dental procedure to to knee implant done a month and half before dental procedure. Took two pills one hour prior and immediate severe burning of throat, esophagous and stomach with constant nausea. Still have symptons - ie loss of voice, low grade nausea. have had multitude of tests - ie. EGD's, monometry, transesophageal (with transmitter to determine extent of now reflux) Have to eat small amounts of food at a time. Have lost 23 lbs. Affects my every day life - difficult to talk on phone, talking in groups - just limit my socialization. Could not work if I wanted to with voice. Throat is constantly sore.

More reviews for: GERD, Pulse - Bounding

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (2 months ago):

  • peanuts on Mar, 31, 2010:

    my friend is suffering from rhumatory arthertis.and is currenty taking cocaine. oxy cotin,prestine, wellbutrim, predisone 10mg what side effects should she expect ?????

    Reply

    mtntexas on May, 11, 2013:

    Just ask John Belushi

    Reply

    2cents on Mar, 6, 2013:

    I'll second that!

    Reply

Post a new comment    OR    Read more comments

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

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