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Suboxone, Librium, Ativan for a 34-year old man

This is a personalized study for a 34 year old male patient who has Drug Withdrawal Syndrome, Anxiety. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 41 male patients aged 34 (±5) who take the same drugs from FDA and social media.

What are the drugs

Suboxone (latest outcomes from 8,245 users) has active ingredients of buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride. It is often used in opiate withdrawal.

Librium (latest outcomes from 1,672 users) has active ingredients of chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride. It is often used in stress and anxiety.

Ativan (latest outcomes from 35,183 users) has active ingredients of lorazepam. It is often used in stress and anxiety.

What are the conditions

Drug withdrawal syndrome (interfere with normal social, occupational, or other functioning. are not due to another medical condition, drug use, or discontinuation) (latest reports from 150,077 patients)

Anxiety (latest reports from 1,275,463 patients) can be treated by Xanax, Clonazepam, Klonopin, Ativan, Lorazepam, Lexapro.

On Jul, 11, 2014: 41 males aged 30 (±5) who take Suboxone, Librium, Ativan are studied

Suboxone, Librium, Ativan outcomes

Information of the patient in this study:

Age: 30

Gender: male

Conditions: Drug Withdrawal Syndrome, Anxiety

Drugs taking:
- Suboxone - 8MG;2MG (buprenorphine hydrochloride; naloxone hydrochloride): used for < 1 month
- Librium - 100MG/AMP (chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride): used for < 1 month
- Ativan - 2MG (lorazepam): used for < 1 month

Drug interactions have: most severe delirious, delusions, sleepy, withdrawn

eHealthMe real world results:

Comparison with this patient's adverse outcomes:

InteractionNumber of reports
among males aged 30 (±5) who take the drugs
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn2 (4.88%)

(as an adverse outcome could be a symptom of a condition, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, regardless of which drug is taken, how many female HBP patients aged 50 (±5) have nausea)

SymptomNumber of reports
among males aged 30 (±5) who have the condition, regardless of which drug is taken
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn in Drug Withdrawal Syndrome1 (2.50%)
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn in Anxiety1 (0.03%)

(as an adverse outcome could be a side effect of a drug, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, how many female Aspirin users aged 50 (±5) have nausea)

Side effectNumber of reports
among males aged 30 (±5) who take the same drug
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn in Suboxone1 (0.12%)
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn in Librium1 (1.64%)
Delirious, Delusions, Sleepy, Withdrawn in Ativan1 (0.10%)

Drug effectiveness over time :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
Suboxone is effective33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
n/an/an/a100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/a
Librium is effective100.00%
(1 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
Ativan is effective33.33%
(1 of 3 people)
n/a0.00%
(0 of 1 people)
n/an/an/an/an/a

Most common drug interactions over time * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ yearsnot specified
AnxietyOverdosen/an/an/aThinking Abnormaln/aWeight Decreased
DeathMigraineDrug Withdrawal SyndromeSuicidal Ideation
Abnormal BehaviourMalaiseDrug Dependence
Night SweatsPulmonary EmbolismDehydration
Chest PainChest PainDrug Withdrawal Syndrome
Suicidal IdeationAnxietyAnxiety
Thinking AbnormalAbnormal BehaviourDrug Addiction
MalaiseNight SweatsHypertension
Drug Withdrawal SyndromeNausea
Psychotic DisorderParaplegia

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

You can also:

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (2 years ago):

  • heroin & alcohol addiction problems - not currently using. overusing lorazepam, extremely sedated. disoriented.

    Reply

  • From this study (2 years ago):

  • Jenny on Oct, 15, 2012:

    Female, age 49
    Portland Oregon

    Reply

    Jenny on Oct, 15, 2012:

    I currently prescribes Suboxone 16 MHD for the past two years. I take it as a pain reliever and to discourage myself from opiates. I also take Ativan 1.5 MHD per day for anxiety and panic. (weaning off)
    Anyway, I am a very active and alert woman fir the most part. Always on my feet! For the past few months I will pass out in the evening simply as I sit down for five minutes! I won't even feel tired! The most disturbing is I have been fainting and hitting my head or hurting myself as a result. I can be walking across my kitchen and the next thing, I come to while bashing into things. I'm literally falling at full speed, dead weight. I can tell because many times I'll wake up before I hit. I'll be ride awake....it's terrifying!!!! I told my dr and she downplays the medicinal aspect of it.

    I don't know what to do. Im not a drug user (recreational) but I feel I look like one'

    Please help!

    Reply

    Metzger on Oct, 18, 2012:

    You CAN NOT mix the two.Your taking two different drugs that will lower your heart rate and slow down your respiratory system. It's not safe and could very well be fatal. I would never even think about mixing them, I have heard of people who stopped breathing in their sleep on account of this. It's like the little label on the side of the perscription bottle says, drinking alcohol may intensify the affects and side affects. Mixing the two drugs intensify the affects of the other.

    Reply

    a marie on Nov, 22, 2012:

    most likely you feel like that because suboxone actually IS a hard drug and it's doing the same thing to your body as the other pain killers have. Suboxone is meant to be used for short periods of time as it is VERY hard to get off of and it's widely abused. I hate to see people get on suboxone and think that it's helping when in the long run, it's only harming :/

    Reply

  • From this study (3 years ago):

  • was put on Vicodin after car accident 1 year later I entered treatment to get off of them and was given Suboxon to relieve symptoms. I continued to have lower back pain and doctor continued to prescribe suboxon for the pain issues. I have used Suboxon for 3 years now. I now have nodules covering my lungs.

    Reply

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

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