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Review: could Botox cause Spinal osteoarthritis?

Summary: Spinal osteoarthritis is found among people who take Botox, especially for people who are female, 40-49 old, also take medication Tamoxifen citrate, and have Pain. We study 12,802 people who have side effects while taking Botox from FDA and social media. Among them, 25 have Spinal osteoarthritis. Find out below who they are, when they have Spinal osteoarthritis and more.

You are not alone: join a support group for people who take Botox and have Spinal osteoarthritis >>>

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Botox

Botox has active ingredients of botulinum toxin type a. It is often used in wrinkles. (latest outcomes from 12,989 Botox users)

Spinal osteoarthritis

Spinal osteoarthritis (joint cartilage loss in spine) has been reported by people with osteoporosis, osteopenia, multiple myeloma, high blood pressure, pain. (latest reports from 8,861 Spinal osteoarthritis patients)

On May, 22, 2015: 12,802 people reported to have side effects when taking Botox. Among them, 25 people (0.20%) have Spinal Osteoarthritis.

Trend of Spinal osteoarthritis in Botox reports

Time on Botox when people have Spinal osteoarthritis * :

n/a

Gender of people who have Spinal osteoarthritis when taking Botox * :

FemaleMale
Spinal osteoarthritis96.15%3.85%

Age of people who have Spinal osteoarthritis when taking Botox * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Spinal osteoarthritis0.00%0.00%0.00%0.00%4.00%44.00%36.00%16.00%

Severity of Spinal osteoarthritis when taking Botox ** :

n/a

How people recovered from Spinal osteoarthritis ** :

n/a

Top conditions involved for these people * :

  1. Pain (12 people, 48.00%)
  2. Neoplasm malignant (11 people, 44.00%)
  3. Depression (11 people, 44.00%)
  4. Pain in jaw (11 people, 44.00%)
  5. Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (5 people, 20.00%)

Top co-used drugs for these people * :

  1. Tamoxifen citrate (14 people, 56.00%)
  2. Peridex (14 people, 56.00%)
  3. Zometa (14 people, 56.00%)
  4. Clindamycin (14 people, 56.00%)
  5. Levaquin (13 people, 52.00%)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

** Reports from social media are used.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Get connected: join our support group of Botox and spinal osteoarthritis on

Do you have Spinal Osteoarthritis while taking Botox?

 

You are not alone! Join a support group on :
- support group for people who take Botox and have Spinal Osteoarthritis
- support group for people who take Botox
- support group for people who have Spinal Osteoarthritis

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More questions for: Botox, Spinal osteoarthritis

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More reviews for: Botox, Spinal osteoarthritis

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (2 months ago):

  • I went to have botox done on my forehead about a month ago. After two weeks, I started to notice a small pimple. I treated it and it slowly went away however more came back and its more like a patch of acne on my forehead thats red and aggravated. I havent started any new medications or changed my routine and yet here they are.

    Reply

  • From this study (3 months ago):

  • Non smoker

    Reply

  • From this study (4 months ago):

  • Have had neck, shoulder and arm pain off and on for years. 2014 MRI discovered spinal arthritis in lumbar with degenerated disc and in spinal arthritis (severe) in cervical area along with bulging discs. I am now having sciatica pain in buttock along with legs jerking and shaking. I am now having neck,shoulder and arm pain along with sudden episodes of arm and wrist drop.

    In early 2013 I started having weakness in ankles both legs. As the year progressed the weakness expanded into my lower legs. In October 2013 I was diagnosed with ALS due EMG test. Now (February 2015) I am 95% wheelchair bound and experiencing all these spine problems. My arms are starting to weaken too - both at the same time.

    All my symptoms in legs and arms are symmetrical- started and progressing in both legs or both arms at same time. I have learned that jaw problems can be caused by spine also. I can't help but wonder if my ALS is being caused by my spine problems.

    Reply

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