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Review: could Lamotrigine cause Hallucination (Hallucinations)?

Summary: Hallucination is found among people who take Lamotrigine, especially for people who are female, 20-29 old, have been taking the drug for 6 - 12 months, also take medication Lorazepam, and have Epilepsy.

We study 14,783 people who have side effects while taking Lamotrigine from FDA and social media. Among them, 115 have Hallucination. Find out below who they are, when they have Hallucination and more.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Lamotrigine and have Hallucination >>>

 

 

 

 

Lamotrigine

Lamotrigine has active ingredients of lamotrigine. It is often used in bipolar disorder. (latest outcomes from 15,825 Lamotrigine users)

Hallucination

Hallucination (an experience involving the perception of something not present) has been reported by people with depression, pain, parkinson's disease, quit smoking, high blood pressure. (latest reports from 30,196 Hallucination patients)

On Feb, 2, 2015: 14,783 people reported to have side effects when taking Lamotrigine. Among them, 115 people (0.78%) have Hallucination.

Trend of Hallucination in Lamotrigine reports

Time on Lamotrigine when people have Hallucination * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ years
Hallucination11.11%16.67%33.33%22.22%0.00%5.56%11.11%

Gender of people who have Hallucination when taking Lamotrigine * :

FemaleMale
Hallucination60.45%39.55%

Age of people who have Hallucination when taking Lamotrigine * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Hallucination0.00%2.65%14.16%29.20%10.62%11.50%21.24%10.62%

Severity of Hallucination when taking Lamotrigine ** :

leastmoderateseveremost severe
Hallucination0.00%50.00%50.00%0.00%

How people recovered from Hallucination ** :

while on the drugafter off the drugnot yet
Hallucination0.00%0.00%100.00%

Top conditions involved for these people * :

  1. Epilepsy (49 people, 42.61%)
  2. Bipolar disorder (15 people, 13.04%)
  3. Depression (14 people, 12.17%)
  4. Convulsion (13 people, 11.30%)
  5. Psychotic disorder (10 people, 8.70%)

Top co-used drugs for these people * :

  1. Lorazepam (23 people, 20.00%)
  2. Valproate sodium (23 people, 20.00%)
  3. Olanzapine (21 people, 18.26%)
  4. Keppra (17 people, 14.78%)
  5. Clonazepam (15 people, 13.04%)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

** Reports from social media are used.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you have Hallucination while taking Lamotrigine?

You are not alone! Join a mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Lamotrigine and have Hallucination
- support group for people who take Lamotrigine
- support group for people who have Hallucination

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More questions for: Lamotrigine, Hallucination

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

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  • A life of depression and fatigue (1 response)
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    While taking this medication, I experienced eye goo, sometimes stringing across my eye. Occasionally it would dry overnight and becoming crusty. I took this medication for over a year and the doctor kept prescribing me medication for conjunctivitis.

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More reviews for: Lamotrigine, Hallucination

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (3 years ago):

  • My son has been having hallocinations just recently. He is seeing a man and hearing noises. He went to the hospital and had blood test, EEG and an MRI and brain infection and tumour of the brain were ruled out.

    Could these be from his lamotrigine? His doctors doesn't think so cause he said it usually happens when you first start taking the drugs or when there is a change. He started taking lamotrigine around Feb 2011 and was fuly on by June just before school started (his is 11 yrs old).

    We increased the dose of this med March 21, 2012 because he had a seisure in March so we increased the nightime dose by 100mg and daytime is 75mg.

    Does anyone know if the cause of his hallocinations be by the lamotrigine??? He also takes ritalin (methaphendate)when he is at school. He takes 15 mg twice a day (the short acting ritalin). Please respond anyone cause I am desperate to figure this out. Thanks

    Reply

    Wally on Jun, 27, 2012:

    For an 11 year old 30 mg is a little too much. Moreover, since it is not the slow or extended release Ritalin, it hits him real hard. Nd Ritalin overdose does cause hallucinations. I myself experienced similar hallucinations,

    But, Ritalin may not be the sole problem. It have be conflicting with his other medication. Or he may have been misdiagnosed and is taking the wrong medication.

    Did His doctor ask for a medical family history. Since ADHD/ADD is generally genetic. If the doctor is certain he has it, but no member of your family has it, then it has been caused by environmental factors. Which is good news for you. Visit your psychiatrist or even better, get a second opinion.

    I hope he gets better soon. And please don't panic in front of him, comfort him, and talk to him in a calm casual manner.observe his behavior, his body language, mannerisms, choice of worlds... So that when you visit the doctor you would be able to provide that additional data that the Doctor may have overlooked or wasnt manifested during his sessions.

    My final suggestion is group therapy

    I hope I've helped in someway.


    I know how hard it is for you, both my parents, brother, nephew and niece have ADHD S well myself.

    Hug him when he seems down. And watch a movie he enjoys.

    P.s. make sure he isn't on any illegal/ prescription/ or any other drug for that matter.

    Also have him re-diagnosed.

    -Waly

    Reply

  • From this study (5 years ago):

  • I am writing this about a frind who has within the past day had a complete psycotic break with reality. She hasn't always been the most menally healthy person, but never, ever, ever has acted the way she is now. I'm just curious as to whether it could be a med interaction (she was just put on the remeron and inderal a few days ago, and also is known to abuse her adderal.)

    Reply

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