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Review: could Loratadine cause Suicide attempt?

Summary: Suicide attempt is found among people who take Loratadine, especially for people who are female, 40-49 old, have been taking the drug for < 1 month, also take medication Zoloft, and have Bipolar disorder.

We study 9,754 people who have side effects while taking Loratadine from FDA and social media. Among them, 63 have Suicide attempt. Find out below who they are, when they have Suicide attempt and more.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Loratadine and have Suicide attempt >>>

 

 

 

 

Loratadine

Loratadine has active ingredients of loratadine. It is often used in allergies. (latest outcomes from 10,980 Loratadine users)

Suicide attempt

Suicide attempt has been reported by people with depression, quit smoking, stress and anxiety, pain, bipolar disorder. (latest reports from 32,157 Suicide attempt patients)

On Jan, 4, 2015: 9,750 people reported to have side effects when taking Loratadine. Among them, 63 people (0.65%) have Suicide Attempt.

Trend of Suicide attempt in Loratadine reports

Time on Loratadine when people have Suicide attempt * :

< 1 month1 - 6 months6 - 12 months1 - 2 years2 - 5 years5 - 10 years10+ years
Suicide attempt72.73%0.00%0.00%0.00%18.18%9.09%0.00%

Gender of people who have Suicide attempt when taking Loratadine * :

FemaleMale
Suicide attempt60.61%39.39%

Age of people who have Suicide attempt when taking Loratadine * :

0-12-910-1920-2930-3940-4950-5960+
Suicide attempt0.00%0.00%21.15%13.46%21.15%25.00%17.31%1.92%

Severity of Suicide attempt when taking Loratadine ** :

n/a

How people recovered from Suicide attempt ** :

n/a

Top conditions involved for these people * :

  1. Bipolar disorder (20 people, 31.75%)
  2. Smoking cessation therapy (15 people, 23.81%)
  3. Insomnia (10 people, 15.87%)
  4. Suicide attempt (10 people, 15.87%)
  5. Uterine haemorrhage (10 people, 15.87%)

Top co-used drugs for these people * :

  1. Zoloft (19 people, 30.16%)
  2. Chantix (15 people, 23.81%)
  3. Clonazepam (14 people, 22.22%)
  4. Seroquel (12 people, 19.05%)
  5. Synthroid (10 people, 15.87%)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

** Reports from social media are used.

How to use the study: print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood.

Do you have Suicide Attempt while taking Loratadine?

You are not alone! Join a mobile support group:
- support group for people who take Loratadine and have Suicide Attempt
- support group for people who take Loratadine
- support group for people who have Suicide Attempt

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More questions for: Loratadine, Suicide attempt

You may be interested at these reviews (Write a review):

  • Wellbutrin buproprion two suicide attempts (1 response)
    Started taking Buproprion and almost immediately had suicide ideation but didn't connect it to the med. Did not want to be here anymore and one week later tried to OD but woke up in the morning. Two weeks later wrote a suicide note to my therapist and again tried to OD. She called the police and they picked me up and took me to the emergency room. Both times I tried to OD on Alcohol and the Buproprion. The first time I took it and just went to bed. The second time I don't remember the note or getting into my car with no shoes and no purse and police pulled me over for the suicidal note to my therapist. They took me to the hospital along with me getting a DUI which I was barely over the alcohol limit.
  • Living with chronic pain while battling with psychological disorders. (1 response)
    I have had back problems since 2004. I have been on pain management since 2007. A year ago I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. Not only does fibromyalgia cause deep wide spread pain, it also makes me feel lethargic, fluish, and greatly effects my daily life. I also have some psychological conditions as well. Mostly due to a traumatic event experienced as a child.
  • Oxybutynin chloride and chest pain
    A urologist prescribed Vesicare (and Estrace cream) early in 2013 for urge incontinance. When hospitalized for cellulitis (never had it before) in May (2013), I took lots of I-V Clindamycin. The hospital had Ditropan on their formulary, and the urologist switched to it (it was cheaper)--and I continued taking Oxybutynin throughout the summer (2013).

    Before 2013, I had had rare episodes of chest pain (not proven angina) no more than once a year. While on Vesicare and Dipropan, the frequency of chest pain increased to once a month, then once a week, then twice a week, then every other day (by late summer). In July I had a treadmill-EKG (with radioisotope) in USA and my family-practice-physician said it was normal and that my chest pain is NOT heart-related. He took me off Indocin and I have since quit taking Meloxicam and aspirin (no NSAIDs now). I returned to where I live overseas in early August and continued to have chest pain with increasing frequency. In the city where I live, it is too hot in the summer, and too cold in the winter. I saw an American doctor (overseas) in mid-August and my heart rate was irregular (I've never been told THAT before). My blood pressure is usually perfect, but this time my diastolic BP was the lowest it's ever been (about 50). My EKG was said to be normal (except slow rate). My normal pulse is about 60. The doctor said the low diastolic blood pressure was my body's way of helping me "beat the heat," and she suggested I lower the dosage of Oxybutynin from 15 mg daily to 10 mg daily--at least until the summer heat abated. [She was concerned about possible synergistic effect of anti-histamine (Claritin) and anti-cholinergic (Oxybutynin).] Having no return of urologic symptoms (which were severe a few months ago), I have since lowered the dosage of Oxybutynin from 10 mg daily to 5 mg daily.

    I am 68 (had total thyroidectomy in 1978, 3 C-sections in the early 1980's, and two total knee replacement surgeries in 1998 and 2007). I had elevated anti-TPO in 2012 and a new dx of auto-immune thyroiditis early in 2013 (but 98% of my thyroid tissue was removed in 1978).

More reviews for: Loratadine, Suicide attempt

Comments from related studies:

  • From this study (1 month ago):

  • Loratadine was prescribed for "sinus headaches" by pediatric doctor, medicine has had no significant impact on allergies or the headaches it was originally prescribed for. Listed symptoms first noticed after approx. 1 to 1.5 years of continuous use.

    Reply

  • From this study (1 month ago):

  • Bleeding symptoms reduce when off medication for nearly a week. Blood clot type content in loose stool (liquid). blood ranges from very dark to bright in same movement. Amount of blood is concern. There is pain and firm area in between upper pelvic and lower abdomen area that disappears after movement and release of blood. I have had scope tests resulting in small neg pollups, and although have hemorrhoids that may bleed on occasion, stool is loose and no pressure is present at the time on the hemorrhoids

    Reply

  • From this study (1 month ago):

  • My ears started ringing about 15 years ago after I was in a really bad car accident.I have had sciatica ever since. My neck was also injured.

    Reply

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