Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and Humira drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and Humira together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and Humira. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 204 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly.



On May, 25, 2018

204 people who take Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate, Humira are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and Humira drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  4. Anger
  5. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Alveolitis (inflammation in the socket of a tooth)
  3. Oedema peripheral (superficial swelling)
  4. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  5. Dizziness
1 - 2 years:
  1. Dermatitis (inflammation of the skin resulting from direct irritation by an external agent or an allergic reaction to it)
  2. Drug hypersensitivity
  3. Eczema (patches of skin become rough and inflamed, with itching and bleeding blisters)
  4. Impaired healing
  5. Localised infection (infection at the single location)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Chills (felling of cold)
  2. Pyrexia (fever)
  3. Urinary tract infection
  4. Aspergillosis (an infection caused by a fungus called aspergillus)
  5. Cardiac arrest
5 - 10 years:
  1. Large granular lymphocytosis (increased number of large granular white blood cells)
  2. Emphysema (chronic respiratory disease - over inflation of the air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs)
  3. Acute coronary syndrome (acute chest pain and other symptoms that happen because the heart does not get blood)
  4. Marrow hyperplasia (increased bone marrow)
  5. Pyrexia (fever)
not specified:
  1. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  2. Pneumonia
  3. Pulmonary fibrosis (formation or development of excess fibrous connective tissue (fibrosis) in the lungs)
  4. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  5. Oedema peripheral (superficial swelling)
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Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  2. Pulmonary fibrosis (formation or development of excess fibrous connective tissue (fibrosis) in the lungs)
  3. Dizziness
  4. Interstitial lung disease
  5. Scab (a hard coating on the skin formed during the wound healing)
male:
  1. Large granular lymphocytosis (increased number of large granular white blood cells)
  2. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  3. Pyrexia (fever)
  4. Pulmonary fibrosis (formation or development of excess fibrous connective tissue (fibrosis) in the lungs)
  5. Splenomegaly (enlargement of spleen)
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Most common drug interactions by age *:

20-29:
  1. Dermatitis (inflammation of the skin resulting from direct irritation by an external agent or an allergic reaction to it)
  2. Drug hypersensitivity
  3. Eczema (patches of skin become rough and inflamed, with itching and bleeding blisters)
  4. Impaired healing
  5. Localised infection (infection at the single location)
30-39:
  1. Alopecia (absence of hair from areas of the body)
  2. Osteonecrosis (death of bone)
  3. Impaired work ability
  4. Nephrolithiasis (calculi in the kidneys)
  5. Neuropathy peripheral (surface nerve damage)
40-49:
  1. Infection
  2. Psoriasis (immune-mediated disease that affects the skin)
  3. Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
  4. Coagulopathy (blood's ability to clot is impaired)
  5. Dactylitis (dactylitis or sausage digit is inflammation of an entire digit (a finger or toe), and can be painful)
50-59:
  1. Pneumonia
  2. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  3. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  4. Anger
  5. Arthralgia (joint pain)
60+:
  1. Pneumonia
  2. Weight decreased
  3. Dizziness
  4. Splenomegaly (enlargement of spleen)
  5. Pyrexia (fever)
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* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

What's next:

Do you take Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate with Humira?



Related studies

Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate

Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate has active ingredients of acetaminophen; codeine phosphate. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate 3,208 users)

Humira

Humira has active ingredients of adalimumab. It is often used in rheumatoid arthritis. (latest outcomes from Humira 387,723 users)


Interactions between Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and drugs from A to Z
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Interactions between Humira and drugs from A to Z
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Browse all drug interactions of Acetaminophen and codeine phosphate and Humira
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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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