Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 45 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly.



On Jun, 22, 2018

45 people who take Atenolol, Vancomycin hydrochloride are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Intestinal perforation (complete penetration of the wall of the intestine)
  2. Respiratory failure (inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system)
  3. Diarrhoea
  4. Rash
  5. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Hypoxia (low oxygen in tissues)
  2. Nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (involves fibrosis of skin, joints, eyes due to kidney disease)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Acute respiratory failure
  2. Cytomegalovirus gastrointestinal infection (virus infection of stomach and intestine)
  3. Renal impairment (severely reduced kidney function)
  4. Drug toxicity
2 - 5 years:
  1. Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture)
  2. Cytomegalovirus colitis (an inflammation of the colon from virus)
not specified:
  1. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  2. Body temperature increased
  3. Bronchospasm (spasm of bronchial smooth muscle producing narrowing of the bronchi)
  4. Cat scratch disease (bacterial infection by cat scratch)
  5. Cheilitis (infection of lips)

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Hyponatraemia (abnormally low level of sodium in the blood; associated with dehydration)
  2. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  3. Hypoxia (low oxygen in tissues)
  4. Jejunal perforation (a hole in jejunum)
  5. Loss of consciousness
male:
  1. Anaphylactic reaction (serious allergic reaction)
  2. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  3. Body temperature increased
  4. Bronchospasm (spasm of bronchial smooth muscle producing narrowing of the bronchi)
  5. Cardiac disorder

Most common drug interactions by age *:

20-29:
  1. Acute respiratory failure
  2. Cytomegalovirus gastrointestinal infection (virus infection of stomach and intestine)
  3. Renal impairment (severely reduced kidney function)
  4. Drug toxicity
30-39:
  1. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  2. Cheilitis (infection of lips)
  3. Chest pain
  4. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  5. Device related infection
40-49:
  1. Diarrhoea
  2. Jejunal perforation (a hole in jejunum)
  3. Peritonitis (inflammation of the peritoneum, the thin tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers most of the abdominal organs)
  4. Post procedural haemorrhage (post procedural bleeding)
  5. Vena cava thrombosis (clotting of the blood in large vein carrying deoxygenated blood into the heart)
50-59:
  1. Pruritus (severe itching of the skin)
  2. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  3. Rash maculo-papular (red area on the skin that is covered with small confluent bumps)
  4. Septic shock (shock due to blood infection)
  5. Anaphylactic reaction (serious allergic reaction)
60+:
  1. Respiratory disorder (respiratory disease)
  2. Rhinitis (a medical term for irritation and inflammation of the mucous membrane inside the nose)
  3. Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death)
  4. Septic shock (shock due to blood infection)
  5. Skin discolouration (change of skin colour)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

What's next: manage your medications



Related studies

Atenolol

Atenolol has active ingredients of atenolol. It is often used in high blood pressure. (latest outcomes from Atenolol 121,313 users)

Vancomycin hydrochloride

Vancomycin hydrochloride has active ingredients of vancomycin hydrochloride. It is often used in mrsa infection. (latest outcomes from Vancomycin hydrochloride 3,409 users)


Interactions between Atenolol and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Vancomycin hydrochloride and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

What would happen?

Predict new side effects and undetected conditions when you take Atenolol and Vancomycin hydrochloride (28,328 reports studied)

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