Diflucan and Topamax drug interactions - from FDA reports

Summary

Drug interactions are reported among people who take Diflucan and Topamax together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 198 people who take Diflucan and Topamax from FDA, and is updated regularly.



What's eHealthMe?

eHealthMe is a health data analysis company based in Mountain View, California. eHealthMe monitors and analyzes the outcomes of drugs and supplements that are currently on the market. The results are readily available to health care professionals and consumers.

eHealthMe has released original studies on market drugs and worked with leading universities and institutions such as IBM, London Health Science Centre, Mayo Clinic, Northwestern University and VA. eHealthMe studies have now been referenced in over 500 peer-reviewed medical publications.

How we gather our data?

Healthcare data is obtained from a number of sources including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This information is aggregated and used to produce personalized reports that patients can reference.

The information that eHealthMe collects includes:

  • Side effects (including severity and how people recover from them)
  • Associated conditions or symptoms
  • Drug effectiveness
  • Demographic data regarding drug use

How the study uses the data?

The study is based on fluconazole and topiramate (the active ingredients of Diflucan and Topamax, respectively), and Diflucan and Topamax (the brand names). Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are not considered.

What is Diflucan?

Diflucan has active ingredients of fluconazole. It is often used in vaginal yeast infection. (latest outcomes from Diflucan 23,190 users)

What is Topamax?

Topamax has active ingredients of topiramate. It is often used in migraine. (latest outcomes from Topamax 43,512 users)

How to use the study?

Patients can bring a copy of the report to their healthcare provider to ensure that all drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. It is recommended that patients use the information presented as a part of a broader decision-making process.


On Mar, 05, 2019

198 people who take Diflucan, Topamax are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Diflucan and Topamax drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Decreased appetite
  2. Somnolence (a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep)
  3. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  4. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  5. Anxiety
  6. Aspartate aminotransferase increased
  7. Blood bilirubin increased
  8. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  9. Headache (pain in head)
  10. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  2. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Aspartate aminotransferase increased
  5. Blood bilirubin increased
  6. Decreased appetite
  7. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  8. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
  9. Hypomagnesaemia (electrolyte disturbance in which there is an abnormally low level of magnesium in the blood)
  10. Hyponatraemia (abnormally low level of sodium in the blood; associated with dehydration)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Seizure (abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  4. Amnesia (deficit in memory caused by brain damage, disease, or psychological trauma)
  5. Cyst (a closed sac)
  6. Decreased appetite
  7. Disturbance in attention
  8. Dizziness
  9. Drug dependence
  10. Drug hypersensitivity
1 - 2 years:
  1. Chronic kidney disease
  2. Seizure (abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain)
  3. Abdominal wall cyst (abnormal membranous sac containing a gaseous, liquid, or semisolid substance on abdominal wall)
  4. Altered state of consciousness (altered state of mind)
  5. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  6. Anal abscess
  7. Anal erosion
  8. Anal polyp (abnormal growth sticking out from the mucous membrane lining the anus or colon)
  9. Bacteraemia (presence of bacteria in the blood)
  10. Carbuncle (a carbuncle is an abscess larger than a boil)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Decreased appetite
  2. Abdominal pain upper
  3. Back pain
  4. Blister (small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure)
  5. Blood pressure increased
  6. Chest pain
  7. Disturbance in attention
  8. Dizziness
  9. Drug ineffective
  10. Drug withdrawal syndrome (interfere with normal social, occupational, or other functioning. are not due to another medical condition, drug use, or discontinuation)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  2. Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
  3. Pulmonary thrombosis (scarring in the lungs)
10+ years:
  1. Amenorrhoea (absence of a menstrual period in a woman of reproductive age)
  2. Anorexia (eating disorder characterized by immoderate food restriction and irrational fear of gaining weight)
  3. Granulomatous liver disease (a mass of inflamed granulation tissue of liver)
  4. Hepatocellular damage (liver damage)
  5. Immune system disorder
  6. Inflammatory bowel disease
  7. Lymphadenopathy (disease or enlargement of lymph nodes)
  8. Myalgia (muscle pain)
  9. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  10. Splenomegaly (enlargement of spleen)
not specified:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Headache (pain in head)
  3. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  4. Abdominal pain
  5. Anxiety
  6. Pain
  7. Chest pain
  8. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  9. Pneumonia
  10. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  3. Vomiting
  4. Pain
  5. Decreased appetite
  6. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  7. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)
  8. Abdominal pain
  9. Chest pain
  10. Sinusitis (inflammation of sinus)
male:
  1. Chest pain
  2. Pain in extremity
  3. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  4. Multiple sclerosis relapse (reoccurrence of a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. it damages the myelin sheath)
  5. Cardiac disorder
  6. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  7. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  8. Epistaxis (bleed from the nose)
  9. Injury
  10. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:

n/a

2-9:

n/a

10-19:
  1. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  2. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Aspartate aminotransferase increased
  5. Blood bilirubin increased
  6. Decreased appetite
  7. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  8. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
  9. Hypomagnesaemia (electrolyte disturbance in which there is an abnormally low level of magnesium in the blood)
  10. Hyponatraemia (abnormally low level of sodium in the blood; associated with dehydration)
20-29:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Borderline personality disorder
  3. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  4. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  6. Alcohol abuse
  7. Alopecia (absence of hair from areas of the body)
  8. Anxiety
  9. Bipolar ii disorder (characterized by at least one episode of hypomania and at least one episode of major depression)
  10. Breast pain
30-39:
  1. Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
  2. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Pain
  5. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  6. Aphasia (damage to the parts of the brain that control language)
  7. Cholecystitis chronic (long lasting infection of gallbladder)
  8. Cough
  9. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  10. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
40-49:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Myalgia (muscle pain)
  3. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  4. Fibromyalgia (a long-term condition which causes pain all over the body)
  5. Diarrhoea
  6. Dysphagia (condition in which swallowing is difficult or painful)
  7. Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)
  8. Pain in extremity
  9. Staphylococcal infection (an infection with staphylococcus bacteria)
  10. Amenorrhoea (absence of a menstrual period in a woman of reproductive age)
50-59:
  1. Restless legs syndrome (a powerful urge to move your legs)
  2. Rhinorrhoea (watery mucus discharge from the nose)
  3. Scoliosis (a medical condition in which a person's spine is curved from side to side)
  4. Scrotal cyst (cyst of scrotum)
  5. Second primary malignancy (after getting cure a cancer, a new cancer development)
  6. Sinus bradycardia (an unusually slow heartbeat due to heart disease)
  7. Sinus tachycardia (a heart rhythm with elevated rate of impulses originating from the sinoatrial node)
  8. Squamous cell carcinoma (a cancer of a kind of epithelial cell)
  9. Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  10. Chest pain
60+:
  1. Pneumonia
  2. Abdominal discomfort
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Movement disorder (neurological syndromes where they may be excess of movement or a paucity of movement that is not connected to weakness)
  5. Muscle spasms (muscle contraction)
  6. Nerve compression
  7. Nervousness
  8. Oxygen saturation decreased
  9. Pain in extremity
  10. Pleural effusion (water on the lungs)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

Do you take Diflucan and Topamax?


You are not alone:




Related publications that referenced our studies

Related studies

Browse interactions by gender and age

Female: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+

Male: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+


Interactions between Diflucan and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Topamax and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Diflucan and Topamax
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

What would happen?

Predict new side effects and undetected conditions when you take Diflucan and Topamax (15,358 reports studied)



FDA reports used in this study


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