Morphine and Clonazepam drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Morphine and Clonazepam together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 2,582 people who take Morphine and Clonazepam from FDA, and is updated regularly.

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On Dec, 15, 2018

2,582 people who take Morphine, Clonazepam are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Morphine and Clonazepam drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Stevens-johnson syndrome (an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity disorder. it ranges from mild skin and mucous membrane lesions to a severe)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  4. Rash
  5. Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death)
  6. Blister (small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure)
  7. Erythema (redness of the skin)
  8. Excoriation (to tear or wear off the skin of)
  9. Skin exfoliation (removal of the oldest dead skin cells)
  10. Dehydration (dryness resulting from the removal of water)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Injection site bruising
  2. Injection site erythema (redness at injection site)
  3. Injection site mass
  4. Injection site pain
  5. Injection site pruritus (severe itching at injection site)
  6. Injection site reaction
  7. Death
  8. Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  9. Fall
  10. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Mental status changes (general changes in brain function, such as confusion, amnesia (memory loss), loss of alertness, loss of orientation)
  2. Overdose
  3. Respiratory failure (inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system)
  4. Acute respiratory failure
  5. Bradyphrenia (neurological term referring to the slowness of thought common to many disorders of the brain)
  6. Brain hypoxia (reduced supply of oxygen to the brain)
  7. Bronchitis (inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes)
  8. Cataplexy (loss of muscle tone accompanied by full conscious awareness)
  9. Cerebral infarction (less blood supply to brain resulting tissue damage)
  10. Cerebral venous thrombosis (clot in brains venous blood system)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Asthenia (weakness)
  2. Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture)
  3. Dizziness
  4. Dysstasia (difficulty in standing)
  5. Eye swelling
  6. Eyelid oedema (eyelids are swollen and contain excessive fluid)
  7. Lip swelling
  8. Renal failure chronic (long lasting kidney dysfunction)
  9. Renal impairment (severely reduced kidney function)
  10. Enterococcal infection
2 - 5 years:
  1. Respiratory arrest (cessation of normal respiration due to failure of the lungs to function effectively)
  2. Respiratory failure (inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system)
  3. Restless legs syndrome (a powerful urge to move your legs)
  4. Self esteem decreased (self worth reduced)
  5. Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death)
  6. Surgery
  7. Therapeutic response unexpected
  8. Urinary tract infection staphylococcal
  9. Venous occlusion (the blocking of venous return)
  10. Depression
5 - 10 years:
  1. Abnormal behaviour
  2. Aggression
  3. Cataplexy (loss of muscle tone accompanied by full conscious awareness)
  4. Convulsion (muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly, resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body)
  5. Cystitis (inflammation of the wall of the bladder)
  6. Depression
  7. Fungal infection
  8. Gastroenteritis bacterial (inflammation of stomach and intestine by bacterial infection)
  9. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  10. Intentional overdose
10+ years:
  1. Pancreatitis acute (sudden inflammation of pancreas)
  2. Pericardial effusion (fluid around the heart)
  3. Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)
  4. Haemorrhoids (a swollen vein or group of veins in the region of the anus)
  5. Hypercholesterolaemia (high levels of cholesterol in the blood)
  6. Hypoacusis (loss of hearing)
  7. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
  8. Local swelling (swelling at the site of some application of substance or injury)
  9. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
  10. Oesophageal candidiasis (fungal infection of oesophagus)
not specified:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  4. Headache (pain in head)
  5. Depression
  6. Vomiting
  7. Fall
  8. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  9. Asthenia (weakness)
  10. Death

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Diarrhoea
  2. Asthenia (weakness)
  3. Pain in extremity
  4. Weight decreased
  5. Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  6. Death
  7. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  8. Constipation
  9. Pyrexia (fever)
  10. Drug ineffective
male:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  3. Vomiting
  4. Pneumonia
  5. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  6. Dizziness
  7. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  8. Headache (pain in head)
  9. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  10. Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:
  1. Pleural effusion (water on the lungs)
  2. Drug withdrawal syndrome neonatal (prenatal nas is caused by discontinuation of drugs taken by the pregnant mother)
  3. Premature baby
  4. Acute pulmonary oedema (sudden deposit of fluid in the lung))
  5. Asthma
  6. Bronchiolitis (inflammation of the membranes lining the bronchioles in lungs)
  7. Bronchitis (inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes)
  8. Fungal infection
  9. Heart disease congenital
  10. Pyrexia (fever)
2-9:
  1. Cerebral haemorrhage (bleeding within the brain)
  2. Pneumonia cytomegaloviral (cmv pneumonia is caused by a member of a group of herpes-type viruses)
  3. Atrioventricular block second degree (heart block second degree)
  4. Bradycardia (abnormally slow heart action)
  5. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  6. Megacolon (a very dilated colon)
  7. Mucosal inflammation (infection of mucous membrane)
  8. Platelet count decreased
  9. Post procedural haemorrhage (post procedural bleeding)
  10. Spinal cord compression
10-19:
  1. Death
  2. Urinary retention (the inability to completely or partially empty the bladder)
  3. Constipation
  4. Feeling abnormal
  5. Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)
  6. Hypoprothrombinaemia (blood disorder in which a deficiency of prothrombin (factor ii) results in impaired blood clotting)
  7. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  8. Intentional overdose
  9. Overdose
  10. Suicidal ideation
20-29:
  1. Drug abuse
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Drug dependence
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Vomiting
  6. Death
  7. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  8. Injury
  9. Asthenia (weakness)
  10. Depressed level of consciousness
30-39:
  1. Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  2. Headache (pain in head)
  3. Chest pain
  4. Constipation
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  6. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  7. Overdose
  8. Death
  9. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  10. Acute pulmonary oedema (sudden deposit of fluid in the lung))
40-49:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Vomiting
  5. Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  6. Depression
  7. Drug ineffective
  8. Pain in extremity
  9. Diarrhoea
  10. Weight increased
50-59:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Pyrexia (fever)
  3. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  4. Headache (pain in head)
  5. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  6. Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  7. Vomiting
  8. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  9. Muscular weakness (muscle weakness)
  10. Urinary tract infection

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

FDA reports used in this study



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Browse by gender and age

Female: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+

Male: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+


Interactions between Morphine and drugs from A to Z
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Interactions between Clonazepam and drugs from A to Z
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Browse all drug interactions of Morphine and Clonazepam
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

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