Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 179 people who take Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine from FDA, and is updated regularly.

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On Jan, 22, 2019

179 people who take Paracetamol, Mercaptopurine are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Pseudomonal sepsis (pseudomonas infections are diseases caused by a bacterium from the genus pseudomonas)
  2. Skin toxicity (skin damage due to toxin/poison)
  3. Staphylococcal infection (an infection with staphylococcus bacteria)
  4. Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  5. Vomiting
  6. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  7. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  8. Anal fistula
  9. C-reactive protein increased
  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis (diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) is high concentrations of ketone bodies)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Bone marrow failure
  2. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  3. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  4. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  5. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  6. Blood albumin decreased
  7. C-reactive protein increased
  8. Dermatitis contact (skin reaction (dermatitis) resulting from exposure to allergens)
  9. Escherichia test positive
  10. Haematocrit decreased
6 - 12 months:

n/a

1 - 2 years:
  1. Acute hepatic failure
  2. Drug level increased
  3. Drug-induced liver injury (diseases of the liver that are caused by physician-prescribed medications)
  4. Hepatotoxicity (chemical-driven liver damage)
  5. Sinusitis (inflammation of sinus)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Abnormal behaviour
  2. Aphasia (damage to the parts of the brain that control language)
  3. Hemianopia homonymous (visual field defect involving either the two right or the two left halves of the visual fields of both eyes)
  4. Hemisensory neglect (loss of sensation on one side of the body-neglect)
  5. Herpes zoster
  6. Motor dysfunction (dysfunction of a muscle, nerve, or centre that effects or produces motion)
  7. Muscular weakness (muscle weakness)
  8. Optic atrophy (the loss of a proportion of optic disc nerve fibres)
  9. Osmotic demyelination syndrome (increased serum sodium level leads to hyponatremic encephalopathy)
  10. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (rapidly progressive neuromuscular disease caused by opportunistic infection of brain cells)
5 - 10 years:

n/a

10+ years:

n/a

not specified:
  1. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  2. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  3. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  4. Hyperbilirubinaemia (excess of bilirubin in the blood)
  5. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  6. Drug hypersensitivity
  7. Bone marrow failure
  8. Gamma-glutamyltransferase increased
  9. Hepatic enzyme increased
  10. Hypertriglyceridaemia (excess of triglycerides in the blood)

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Hypocalcaemia (levels of calcium in blood serum are abnormally low)
  4. Lip swelling
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  6. Swollen tongue (swelling of tongue)
  7. Anal fistula
  8. Anaphylactic shock (severe and rapid and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reaction to a substance)
  9. Blood immunoglobulin a decreased
  10. Blood immunoglobulin g decreased
male:
  1. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  2. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  3. Hepatosplenic t-cell lymphoma (neoplasm comprising medium-sized cytotoxic t-cells that show a significant sinusoidal infiltration in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow)
  4. Influenza like illness
  5. Lethargy (tiredness)
  6. Leukopenia (less number of white blood cells in blood)
  7. Pelvic pain
  8. Platelet count decreased
  9. Rectal abscess (pus in rectum)
  10. Rectal discharge (discharge from rectum)

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:
  1. Hepatocellular injury (liver injury)
  2. Anaphylactic shock (severe and rapid and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reaction to a substance)
  3. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
2-9:
  1. Gastroenteritis (inflammation of stomach and intestine)
  2. Hypophagia (reduced food intake)
  3. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  4. Injection site pain
  5. Irritability
  6. Mucosal inflammation (infection of mucous membrane)
  7. Urticaria (rash of round, red welts on the skin that itch intensely)
  8. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  9. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  10. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
10-19:
  1. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Febrile bone marrow aplasia (bone marrow greatly decreases or stops production of blood cells)
  4. Hypoalbuminaemia (levels of albumin in blood serum are abnormally low)
  5. Dehydration (dryness resulting from the removal of water)
  6. Drug ineffective
  7. Dystonia (abnormal muscle tone)
  8. Lacrimation increased
  9. Lip swelling
  10. Swollen tongue (swelling of tongue)
20-29:
  1. Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  2. Anal fistula
  3. Erythema (redness of the skin)
  4. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating)
  5. Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  6. Infusion related reaction
  7. Palpitations (feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing)
  8. Swelling face
  9. Abdominal pain
  10. Anorectal infection
30-39:
  1. Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  2. Anal fistula
  3. C-reactive protein increased
  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis (diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) is high concentrations of ketone bodies)
  5. Hepatosplenic t-cell lymphoma (neoplasm comprising medium-sized cytotoxic t-cells that show a significant sinusoidal infiltration in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow)
  6. Influenza like illness
  7. Jaundice (a yellowish pigmentation of the skin, the conjunctival membranes)
  8. Lethargy (tiredness)
  9. Leukopenia (less number of white blood cells in blood)
  10. Neutropenia (an abnormally low number of neutrophils)
40-49:
  1. Embolism (obstruction of an artery, typically by a clot of blood or an air bubble)
  2. Pneumonia
50-59:
  1. Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture)
  2. Chills (felling of cold)
  3. Disorientation (disability in which the senses of time, direction, and recognition of people and places)
  4. Dizziness
  5. Dysarthria (speech disorder)
  6. Facial paresis (weakness in facial muscle movement)
  7. Fall
  8. Femoral neck fracture (neck of femur bone fracture)
  9. General physical health deterioration (weak health status)
  10. Hemianopia homonymous (visual field defect involving either the two right or the two left halves of the visual fields of both eyes)
60+:
  1. Hypocalcaemia (levels of calcium in blood serum are abnormally low)
  2. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
  3. Hypomagnesaemia (electrolyte disturbance in which there is an abnormally low level of magnesium in the blood)
  4. Hypophosphataemia (electrolyte disturbance in which there is an abnormally low level of phosphate in the blood)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

Do you take Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine?


You are not alone:




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Browse by gender and age

Female: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+

Male: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+


Interactions between Paracetamol and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Mercaptopurine and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

What would happen?

Predict new side effects and undetected conditions when you take Paracetamol and Mercaptopurine (29,063 reports studied)

FDA reports used in this study



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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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