Singulair and Synthroid drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Singulair and Synthroid together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 5,285 people who take Singulair and Synthroid from FDA, and is updated regularly.

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On Jan, 19, 2019

5,285 people who take Singulair, Synthroid are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Singulair and Synthroid drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Gait disturbance
  2. Pruritus (severe itching of the skin)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  6. Injury
  7. Rash
  8. Alopecia (absence of hair from areas of the body)
  9. Blister (small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure)
  10. Bone pain
1 - 6 months:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Suicidal ideation
  3. Alanine aminotransferase increased
  4. Anorexia (eating disorder characterized by immoderate food restriction and irrational fear of gaining weight)
  5. Aspartate aminotransferase increased
  6. Eosinophil count increased
  7. General symptom
  8. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  9. Neuropathy peripheral (surface nerve damage)
  10. Depression
6 - 12 months:
  1. Depression
  2. Somnolence (a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep)
  3. Cough
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Gallbladder disorder
  6. Pain
  7. Prescribed overdose
  8. Renal cyst (kidney cyst)
  9. Suicidal ideation
  10. Abdominal pain
1 - 2 years:
  1. Depression
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)
  4. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  6. Abdominal distension
  7. Abdominal pain
  8. Allergic granulomatous angiitis (allergic inflammation of a blood vessel or lymph duct)
  9. Anxiety
  10. Blood thyroid stimulating hormone decreased
2 - 5 years:
  1. Anxiety
  2. Depression
  3. Migraine (headache)
  4. Allergic granulomatous angiitis (allergic inflammation of a blood vessel or lymph duct)
  5. Pain
  6. Back pain
  7. Cellulitis (infection under the skin)
  8. Condition
  9. Irritable bowel syndrome
  10. Oedema (fluid collection in tissue)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Palpitations (feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing)
  3. Paraesthesia (sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect)
  4. Productive cough
  5. Abdominal pain
  6. Bronchitis (inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes)
  7. Chronic kidney disease
  8. Depression
  9. Dizziness
  10. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
10+ years:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Asthenia (weakness)
  4. Chest pain
  5. Cholelithiasis (the presence or formation of gallstones in the gallbladder or bile ducts)
  6. Decreased appetite
  7. Dyspepsia (indigestion)
  8. Emotional distress
  9. Fall
  10. Headache (pain in head)
not specified:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Pain
  3. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Headache (pain in head)
  6. Drug ineffective
  7. Diarrhoea
  8. Fall
  9. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  10. Back pain

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

male:
  1. Pain
  2. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  3. Pyrexia (fever)
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Oedema peripheral (superficial swelling)
  6. Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  7. Injury
  8. Back pain
  9. Asthenia (weakness)
  10. Chest pain

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:
  1. Drug ineffective
  2. Jaundice (a yellowish pigmentation of the skin, the conjunctival membranes)
  3. Application site erythema (redness of the skin at application site)
  4. Application site pruritus (application site severe itching of the skin)
  5. Cough
  6. Depression
  7. Drug exposure during pregnancy
  8. Dry throat
  9. Dysphonia (speech disorder attributable to a disorder of phonation)
  10. Flatulence (flatus expelled through the anus)
2-9:
  1. Erythema (redness of the skin)
  2. Death
  3. Hypersensitivity
  4. Lung infection
  5. Pain
  6. Pyrexia (fever)
  7. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  8. Anaphylactic reaction (serious allergic reaction)
  9. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  10. Flushing (the warm, red condition of human skin)
10-19:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Suicidal ideation
  3. Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  4. Suicide attempt
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  6. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  7. Vomiting
  8. Depression
  9. Abdominal discomfort
  10. Abdominal pain
20-29:
  1. Anxiety
  2. Drug ineffective
  3. Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
  4. Vomiting
  5. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  6. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  7. Pain
  8. Fall
  9. Injury
  10. Memory impairment
30-39:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Pain
  3. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  6. Dizziness
  7. Pain in extremity
  8. Depression
  9. Diarrhoea
  10. Abdominal pain
40-49:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Pain
  3. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  4. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  5. Headache (pain in head)
  6. Pyrexia (fever)
  7. Cough
  8. Bronchitis (inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes)
  9. Dizziness
  10. Diarrhoea
60+:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Back pain
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Pneumonia
  6. Cough
  7. Vomiting
  8. Pain in extremity
  9. Weight decreased
  10. Gait disturbance

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

Do you take Singulair and Synthroid?


You are not alone:




Related studies

Singulair

Singulair has active ingredients of montelukast sodium. It is often used in asthma. (latest outcomes from Singulair 80,352 users)

Synthroid

Synthroid has active ingredients of levothyroxine sodium. It is often used in hypothyroidism. (latest outcomes from Synthroid 170,727 users)


Browse by gender and age

Female: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+

Male: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+


Interactions between Singulair and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Synthroid and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Singulair and Synthroid
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Related publications that referenced our studies

What would happen?

Predict new side effects and undetected conditions when you take Singulair and Synthroid (65,801 reports studied)

FDA reports used in this study



Recent updates

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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