Vitamin c and Magnesium drug interactions - from FDA reports

Summary

Drug interactions are reported among people who take Vitamin c and Magnesium together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 3,712 people who take Vitamin c and Magnesium from FDA, and is updated regularly.



What's eHealthMe?

eHealthMe is a health data analysis company based in Mountain View, California. eHealthMe monitors and analyzes the outcomes of drugs and supplements that are currently on the market. The results are readily available to health care professionals and consumers.

eHealthMe has released original studies on market drugs and worked with leading universities and institutions such as IBM, London Health Science Centre, Mayo Clinic, Northwestern University and VA. eHealthMe studies have now been referenced in over 500 peer-reviewed medical publications.

How we gather our data?

Healthcare data is obtained from a number of sources including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This information is aggregated and used to produce personalized reports that patients can reference.

The information that eHealthMe collects includes:

  • Side effects (including severity and how people recover from them)
  • Associated conditions or symptoms
  • Drug effectiveness
  • Demographic data regarding drug use

How the study uses the data?

The study is based on l-ascorbic acid and magnesium (the active ingredients of Vitamin c and Magnesium, respectively), and Vitamin c and Magnesium (the brand names). Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are not considered.

What is Vitamin c?

Vitamin c has active ingredients of l-ascorbic acid. It is often used in vitamin supplementation. (latest outcomes from Vitamin c 35,692 users)

What is Magnesium?

Magnesium has active ingredients of magnesium. It is often used in constipation. (latest outcomes from Magnesium 45,408 users)

How to use the study?

Patients can bring a copy of the report to their healthcare provider to ensure that all drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. It is recommended that patients use the information presented as a part of a broader decision-making process.


On Feb, 23, 2019

3,712 people who take Vitamin c, Magnesium are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Vitamin c and Magnesium drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

1 - 6 months:
  1. Pregnancy
  2. Syncope (loss of consciousness with an inability to maintain postural tone)
  3. Vision blurred
  4. Abdominal distension
  5. Abdominal pain
  6. Acne (skin problems that cause pimples)
  7. Acne cystic (skin problems that cause pimples)
  8. Alexia
  9. Allergy to metals
  10. Alopecia (absence of hair from areas of the body)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Musculoskeletal chest pain (pain in chest muscle or nerve or bones)
  2. Blood creatinine increased
  3. Confusional state
  4. Dyspepsia (indigestion)
  5. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  6. Hypercalcaemia (elevated calcium (ca+) level in the blood)
  7. Hypokalaemia (low potassium)
  8. Live birth
  9. Malignant neoplasm progression (cancer tumour came back)
  10. Maternal exposure during pregnancy (use of substance during pregnancy)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Memory impairment
  2. Abnormal behaviour
  3. Blood calcium decreased
  4. Bone density decreased
  5. Seizure (abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain)
  6. Weight increased
  7. Wheezing (a high-pitched whistling sound made while you breath)
  8. Ear infection
  9. Fall
  10. Sinusitis (inflammation of sinus)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Aortic aneurysm (enlargement of an aortic artery caused by a weakening of the artery wall)
  2. Pre-existing condition improved
  3. Skin irritation
  4. Therapeutic response unexpected
  5. Arthritis (form of joint disorder that involves inflammation of one or more joints)
  6. Blood pressure increased
  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe)
  8. Coronary artery disease (plaque building up along the inner walls of the arteries of the heart, which narrows the arteries and restricts blood flow to the heart)
  9. Depression
  10. Fibromyalgia (a long-term condition which causes pain all over the body)
5 - 10 years:

n/a

10+ years:
  1. Arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)
  2. Palpitations (feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing)
  3. Endometrial cancer
  4. Fall
  5. Neoplasm progression (growth of tumour)
  6. Second primary malignancy (after getting cure a cancer, a new cancer development)
  7. Suicidal ideation
  8. Vitamin d deficiency
  9. Dry eye (lack of adequate tears)
  10. Malabsorption (a state arising from abnormality in absorption of food nutrients across the gastrointestinal (gi) tract)
not specified:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Diarrhoea
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Headache (pain in head)
  6. Pain
  7. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  8. Dizziness
  9. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  10. Insomnia (sleeplessness)

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Pain in extremity
  2. Dizziness
  3. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  4. Fall
  5. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  6. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  7. Anxiety
  8. Depression
  9. Asthenia (weakness)
  10. Gait disturbance
male:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Dizziness
  3. Back pain
  4. Fall
  5. Decreased appetite
  6. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  7. Rash
  8. Myalgia (muscle pain)
  9. Memory impairment
  10. Weight decreased

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:
  1. Foetal exposure during pregnancy (exposing your unborn child to contraindicated in pregnancy leads birth defect)
  2. Motor developmental delay (delayed walking and doing self movement)
  3. Premature baby
  4. Abnormal faeces (abnormal stool)
  5. Ankyloglossia congenital (a congenital anomaly in which the mucous membrane under the tongue is too short limiting the mobility of the tongue)
  6. Blood potassium decreased
  7. Dacryocanaliculitis (1. inflammation of the lacrimal ducts. 2. inflammation of the lacrimal sac and lacrimal canaliculi)
  8. Dacryostenosis acquired (obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct-acquired)
  9. Ear infection
  10. Headache (pain in head)
2-9:
  1. Anxiety
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Seizure (abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain)
  4. Adjustment disorder
  5. Alopecia universalis (rapid loss of all hair, including eyebrows and eyelashes)
  6. Anger
  7. Aphasia (damage to the parts of the brain that control language)
  8. Apnoea (suspension of external breathing)
  9. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  10. Arthropathy
10-19:
  1. Anxiety
  2. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  3. Cough
  4. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  5. Pain
  6. Asthenia (weakness)
  7. Dizziness
  8. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  9. Intentional self-injury
  10. Pyrexia (fever)
20-29:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  3. Depression
  4. Diarrhoea
  5. Drug ineffective
  6. Anxiety
  7. Palpitations (feelings or sensations that your heart is pounding or racing)
  8. Tendon pain
  9. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating)
  10. Liver injury
30-39:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Depression
  3. Anxiety
  4. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  5. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  6. Dizziness
  7. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  8. Gait disturbance
  9. Paraesthesia (sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect)
  10. Pneumonia
40-49:
  1. Depression
  2. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  3. Pneumonia
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Headache (pain in head)
  6. Bronchitis (inflammation of the mucous membrane in the bronchial tubes)
  7. Cystitis (inflammation of the wall of the bladder)
  8. Cystitis haemorrhagic (blood in the urine and painful voiding)
  9. Hip arthroplasty
  10. Pneumonia aspiration (bronchopneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign materials into the bronchial tree)
50-59:
  1. Anxiety
  2. Fall
  3. Dizziness
  4. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)
  5. Weight increased
  6. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  7. Back pain
  8. Vomiting
  9. Depression
  10. Paraesthesia (sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect)
60+:
  1. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  2. Diarrhoea
  3. Fall
  4. Back pain
  5. Pain in extremity
  6. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  7. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  8. Gait disturbance
  9. Muscle spasms (muscle contraction)
  10. Weight decreased

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.


Do you take Vitamin c and Magnesium?

You are not alone:




Related studies

Browse interactions by gender and age

Female: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+

Male: 0-1 2-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+


Interactions between Vitamin c and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Magnesium and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Vitamin c and Magnesium
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

What would happen?

Predict new side effects and undetected conditions when you take Vitamin c and Magnesium (9,340 reports studied)



FDA reports used in this study


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