Vitamin c and Vitamin b12 drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Vitamin c and Vitamin b12 together. This study is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 3,655 people who take Vitamin c and Vitamin b12 from FDA, and is updated regularly.

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On Aug, 06, 2018

3,655 people who take Vitamin c, Vitamin b12 are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Vitamin c and Vitamin b12 drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Depression
  2. Cerebral disorder (brain disease)
  3. Anxiety
  4. Ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity)
  5. Back pain
1 - 6 months:
  1. Fall
  2. Pulmonary tuberculosis (lungs tuberculosis)
  3. Thrombosis (formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel)
  4. Anxiety
  5. Arthralgia (joint pain)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Pain
  3. Peripheral ischaemia (impaired circulation to an extremity)
  4. Pre-existing condition improved
  5. Proteinuria (presence of protein in the urine)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Depression
  2. Suicidal ideation
  3. Syncope (loss of consciousness with an inability to maintain postural tone)
  4. Ankle fracture
  5. Atrial fibrillation (fibrillation of the muscles of the atria of the heart)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating)
  3. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (abnormal increase in heart rate on becoming upright)
  4. Weight decreased
10+ years:
  1. Bowen's disease (early stage of skin cancer)
  2. Malignant melanoma in situ (early stage of cancer in melanocyte)
  3. Constipation
  4. Delirium (wild excitement)
  5. Drug ineffective
not specified:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Diarrhoea
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Pain
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Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Dizziness
  2. Pain in extremity
  3. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  4. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  5. Asthenia (weakness)
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Most common drug interactions by age *:

10-19:
  1. Dizziness
  2. Headache (pain in head)
  3. Migraine (headache)
  4. Muscular weakness (muscle weakness)
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
20-29:
  1. Diarrhoea
  2. Pain
  3. Anxiety
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Back pain
30-39:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Headache (pain in head)
  3. Fall
  4. Influenza like illness
  5. Muscle spasms (muscle contraction)
40-49:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Pain
  4. Dizziness
  5. Diarrhoea
50-59:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Headache (pain in head)
  3. Fall
  4. Pain in extremity
  5. Pain
60+:
  1. Fall
  2. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  3. Weight decreased
  4. Pneumonia
  5. Somnolence (a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep)
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* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

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Related studies

Vitamin c

Vitamin c has active ingredients of l-ascorbic acid. It is often used in vitamin supplementation. (latest outcomes from Vitamin c 24,866 users)

Vitamin b12

Vitamin b12 has active ingredients of cobalamin. It is often used in vitamin b12 deficiency. (latest outcomes from Vitamin b12 34,781 users)


Interactions between Vitamin c and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Interactions between Vitamin b12 and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Vitamin c and Vitamin b12
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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