Xanax and Effexor drug interactions - from FDA reports


Drug interactions are reported among people who take Xanax and Effexor together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Xanax and Effexor. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 4,515 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly.



On Jun, 25, 2018

4,515 people who take Xanax, Effexor are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Xanax and Effexor drug interactions.

Most common drug interactions over time *:

< 1 month:
  1. Drug withdrawal syndrome (interfere with normal social, occupational, or other functioning. are not due to another medical condition, drug use, or discontinuation)
  2. Suicide attempt
  3. Somnolence (a state of near-sleep, a strong desire for sleep)
  4. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  5. Feeling abnormal
1 - 6 months:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Weight decreased
  3. Dizziness
  4. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating)
  5. Loss of consciousness
6 - 12 months:
  1. Tinnitus (a ringing in the ears)
  2. Weight increased
  3. Drug withdrawal syndrome (interfere with normal social, occupational, or other functioning. are not due to another medical condition, drug use, or discontinuation)
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Drug exposure during pregnancy
1 - 2 years:
  1. Fall
  2. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  3. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  4. Confusional state
  5. Aphasia (damage to the parts of the brain that control language)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Vomiting
  2. Sleep apnoea syndrome (a sleep-related disorder in which the effort to breathe is diminished or absent)
  3. Tremor (trembling or shaking movements in one or more parts of your body)
  4. Mental disorder (a psychological term for a mental or behavioural pattern or anomaly that causes distress or disability)
  5. Convulsion (muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly, resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Blood triglycerides increased
  2. Hypoaesthesia (reduced sense of touch or sensation)
  3. Intentional overdose
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Vertigo
10+ years:
  1. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  2. Dysuria (painful or difficult urination)
  3. Dyspepsia (indigestion)
  4. Weight decreased
  5. Burn oesophageal (burn in the oesophagus)
not specified:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Pain
  3. Fall
  4. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  5. Weight increased

Most common drug interactions by gender *:

female:
  1. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  2. Back pain
  3. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  4. Drug ineffective
  5. Headache (pain in head)
male:
  1. Headache (pain in head)
  2. Pain
  3. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating)

Most common drug interactions by age *:

0-1:
  1. Drug exposure during pregnancy
  2. Regurgitation of food (expulsion of material from the mouth, pharynx, or oesophagus)
  3. Neonatal disorder (disease of neonates)
  4. Cardio-respiratory arrest neonatal
  5. Cardio-respiratory distress (increased breaths and heart rate)
2-9:
  1. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  2. Drug hypersensitivity
  3. Dyspepsia (indigestion)
  4. Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus)
  5. Haematocrit decreased
20-29:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Drug ineffective
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  5. Weight increased
30-39:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  3. Pain
  4. Diarrhoea
  5. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
40-49:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Pain
  3. Headache (pain in head)
  4. Dizziness
  5. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes, caused by a deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin)
50-59:
  1. Fall
  2. Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration)
  3. Back pain
  4. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  5. Pain
60+:
  1. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  2. Dizziness
  3. Arthralgia (joint pain)
  4. Back pain
  5. Hypertension (high blood pressure)

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

What's next:

You could also:



Related studies

Xanax

Xanax has active ingredients of alprazolam. It is often used in stress and anxiety. (latest outcomes from Xanax 91,868 users)

Effexor

Effexor has active ingredients of venlafaxine hydrochloride. It is often used in depression. (latest outcomes from Effexor 75,059 users)


Interactions between Xanax and drugs from A to Z
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Interactions between Effexor and drugs from A to Z
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z
Browse all drug interactions of Xanax and Effexor
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered.

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