A study for a 83 year old woman who takes Pradaxa - from FDA reports


9,299 females aged 83 (±5) who take the same drug are studied. This is a personalized study for a 83 year old female patient who has A-Fib. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports from FDA.

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On Feb, 17, 2019

9,299 females aged 83 (±5) who take Pradaxa are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Pradaxa for a 83-year old woman.

Information of the patient in this study:

  • Age: 83
  • Gender: female
  • Conditions: A-Fib
  • Drugs taken:
    • Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate mesylate)

eHealthMe real world results:

Comparison with this patient's adverse outcomes:

  • Neuropathy(damage to nerves): 0 (0% of females aged 83 (±5) who take the drug)

As an adverse outcome could be a symptom of a condition, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, regardless of which drug is taken, how many female HBP patients aged 50 (±5) have nausea

As an adverse outcome could be a side effect of a drug, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, how many female Aspirin users aged 50 (±5) have nausea

Most common side effects over time

< 1 month:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Rectal haemorrhage (bleeding from anus)
  3. Haematochezia (passage of stools containing blood)
  4. Nausea and vomiting
  5. Diarrhea
  6. Breathing difficulty
  7. Fall
  8. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  9. International normalised ratio increased
  10. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
1 - 6 months:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  3. Rectal haemorrhage (bleeding from anus)
  4. Haemorrhagic anaemia (anaemia due to excessive bleeding)
  5. Fall
  6. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  7. Bleeding disorders
  8. Head injury
  9. Weakness
  10. Haemorrhage (bleeding)
6 - 12 months:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  3. Fall
  4. Haemorrhagic anaemia (anaemia due to excessive bleeding)
  5. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (upper gastrointestinal bleeding)
  6. Rectal haemorrhage (bleeding from anus)
  7. Lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding in the large intestine, rectum, or anus is called lower gi bleeding)
  8. Bleeding disorders
  9. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  10. Ischaemic stroke (stroke; caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Rectal haemorrhage (bleeding from anus)
  3. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  4. Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  5. Hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure)
  6. Fall
  7. Haemorrhagic anaemia (anaemia due to excessive bleeding)
  8. Haemoglobin decreased
  9. Stroke (sudden death of a portion of the brain cells due to a lack of oxygen)
  10. Lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding in the large intestine, rectum, or anus is called lower gi bleeding)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding in the large intestine, rectum, or anus is called lower gi bleeding)
  3. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  4. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (upper gastrointestinal bleeding)
  5. Stroke (sudden death of a portion of the brain cells due to a lack of oxygen)
  6. Cerebral haemorrhage (bleeding within the brain)
  7. Fall
  8. Haemorrhage intracranial (bleeding within the skull)
  9. Haemorrhagic anaemia (anaemia due to excessive bleeding)
  10. Subdural haematoma (blood collects between the skull and the surface of the brain)
5 - 10 years:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Haemorrhage (bleeding)
  3. Dizziness
  4. Weakness
  5. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  6. Head injury
  7. Cardiac failure congestive
  8. Nausea and vomiting
  9. Cuts and puncture wounds
  10. Cerebral haemorrhage (bleeding within the brain)
10+ years:
n/a
not specified:
  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract)
  2. Fall
  3. Stroke (sudden death of a portion of the brain cells due to a lack of oxygen)
  4. Head injury
  5. Anaemia (lack of blood)
  6. Dizziness
  7. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  8. Haemorrhage (bleeding)
  9. Indigestion
  10. Diarrhea

Top conditions involved for these people *:

  1. High Blood Pressure : 1,601 people, 17.22%
  2. Stroke (sudden death of a portion of the brain cells due to a lack of oxygen): 813 people, 8.74%
  3. High Blood Cholesterol : 684 people, 7.36%
  4. Hypothyroidism (abnormally low activity of the thyroid gland, resulting in retardation of growth and mental development): 465 people, 5.00%
  5. Anticoagulant Therapy : 339 people, 3.65%
  6. Preventive Health Care : 318 people, 3.42%
  7. Cardiac Disorder : 277 people, 2.98%
  8. Diabetes : 244 people, 2.62%
  9. Pain : 230 people, 2.47%
  10. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (a condition in which stomach contents leak backward from the stomach into the oesophagus): 216 people, 2.32%

Top co-used drugs for these people *:

  1. Lasix (805 people, 8.66%)
  2. Aspirin (569 people, 6.12%)
  3. Synthroid (517 people, 5.56%)
  4. Digoxin (492 people, 5.29%)
  5. Lipitor (414 people, 4.45%)
  6. Furosemide (389 people, 4.18%)
  7. Lisinopril (334 people, 3.59%)
  8. Simvastatin (328 people, 3.53%)
  9. Crestor (252 people, 2.71%)
  10. Metoprolol Tartrate (238 people, 2.56%)

* Some reports may have incomplete information.

You are not alone:

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FDA reports used in this study


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NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients are also considered.

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You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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