A study for a 39 year old woman who takes Chantix - from FDA reports

Summary

5,241 females aged 39 (±5) who take the same drug are studied. This is a personalized study for a 39 year old female patient who has Cessation Of Smoking. The study is created by eHealthMe based on reports from FDA.



How the study uses the data?

The study is based on gender, age, active ingredients of any drugs used. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are considered.

What are the drugs?

What are the conditions?

What are the symtoms?

How to use the study?

Patients can bring a copy of the report to their healthcare provider to ensure that all drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. It is recommended that patients use the information presented as a part of a broader decision-making process.

Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

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On Apr, 15, 2019

5,241 females aged 39 (±5) who take Chantix are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Chantix for a 39-year old woman.

Information of the patient in this study:

  • Age: 39
  • Gender: female
  • Conditions: Cessation Of Smoking
  • Drugs taken:
    • Chantix (varenicline tartrate)

eHealthMe real world results:

Comparison with this patient's adverse outcomes:

  • Sleep Talking(talking during sleeping): 5 (0.1% of females aged 39 (±5) who take the drug)

As an adverse outcome could be a symptom of a condition, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, regardless of which drug is taken, how many female HBP patients aged 50 (±5) have nausea

As an adverse outcome could be a side effect of a drug, additional studies are listed to help identify the cause: for example, how many female Aspirin users aged 50 (±5) have nausea

Most common side effects over time

< 1 month:
  1. Depression
  2. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  3. Suicide attempt
  4. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
  5. Nightmares (unpleasant dreams)
  6. Agitation (state of anxiety or nervous excitement)
  7. Anger
  8. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  9. Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness)
  10. Irritability
1 - 6 months:
  1. Depression
  2. Stress and anxiety
  3. Suicidal ideation
  4. Suicide attempt
  5. Aggression
  6. Intentional overdose
  7. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  8. Mental disorder (a psychological term for a mental or behavioural pattern or anomaly that causes distress or disability)
  9. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  10. Abnormal dreams
6 - 12 months:
  1. Depression
  2. Stress and anxiety
  3. Suicide attempt
  4. Intentional overdose
  5. Suicidal ideation
  6. Aggression
  7. Abnormal behavior
  8. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  9. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
  10. Mental disorder (a psychological term for a mental or behavioural pattern or anomaly that causes distress or disability)
1 - 2 years:
  1. Depression
  2. Stress and anxiety
  3. Suicide attempt
  4. Intentional overdose
  5. Mental disorder (a psychological term for a mental or behavioural pattern or anomaly that causes distress or disability)
  6. Aggression
  7. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  8. Suicidal ideation
  9. Loss of consciousness
  10. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
2 - 5 years:
  1. Depression
  2. Stress and anxiety
  3. Suicide attempt
  4. Intentional overdose
  5. Aggression
  6. Mental disorder (a psychological term for a mental or behavioural pattern or anomaly that causes distress or disability)
  7. Abnormal behavior
  8. Bipolar disorder (mood disorder)
  9. Loss of consciousness
  10. Suicidal ideation
5 - 10 years:
  1. Rashes (redness)
  2. Skin blushing/flushing (a sudden reddening of the face, neck)
10+ years:
  1. Aggression
  2. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  3. Mood swings (an extreme or rapid change in mood)
  4. Depression
not specified:
  1. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  2. Stress and anxiety
  3. Abnormal dreams
  4. Depression
  5. Headache (pain in head)
  6. Nausea and vomiting
  7. Insomnia (sleeplessness)
  8. Feeling abnormal
  9. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness)
  10. Dizziness

Top conditions involved for these people *:

  1. Depression : 432 people, 8.24%
  2. Stress And Anxiety : 349 people, 6.66%
  3. Pain : 207 people, 3.95%
  4. High Blood Pressure : 181 people, 3.45%
  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (a condition in which stomach contents leak backward from the stomach into the oesophagus): 134 people, 2.56%
  6. Bipolar Disorder (mood disorder): 115 people, 2.19%
  7. High Blood Cholesterol : 104 people, 1.98%
  8. Sleep Disorder : 102 people, 1.95%
  9. Asthma : 101 people, 1.93%
  10. Insomnia (sleeplessness): 92 people, 1.76%

Top co-used drugs for these people *:

  1. Xanax (246 people, 4.69%)
  2. Lexapro (181 people, 3.45%)
  3. Synthroid (178 people, 3.40%)
  4. Klonopin (176 people, 3.36%)
  5. Albuterol (170 people, 3.24%)
  6. Cymbalta (164 people, 3.13%)
  7. Zoloft (138 people, 2.63%)
  8. Seroquel (130 people, 2.48%)
  9. Wellbutrin (124 people, 2.37%)
  10. Paxil (122 people, 2.33%)

* Some reports may have incomplete information.


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You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/ or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).

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