Acetaminophen side effects - from FDA reports


In this review, we analyze Acetaminophen side effects by the time on the drug, gender and age of the people who have side effects while taking Acetaminophen. The review is based on 74,620 people who have side effects while taking the drug from FDA, and is updated regularly.

Acetaminophen

Acetaminophen has active ingredients of acetaminophen. It is often used in pain. (latest outcomes from Acetaminophen 76,319 users)


On Jun, 08, 2018

74,620 people who take Acetaminophen are studied.


Number of reports submitted per year:

Acetaminophen side effects.

Most common side effects over time *:

< 1 month:
  • Vomiting
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis (a rare, life-threatening skin condition that is usually caused by a reaction to drugs causes wide spread skin destruction)
  • Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  • Suicide attempt
  • Pneumonia
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Stevens-johnson syndrome (an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity disorder. it ranges from mild skin and mucous membrane lesions to a severe)
  • Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death)
1 - 6 months:
  • Vomiting
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Neutropenia (an abnormally low number of neutrophils)
  • Alanine aminotransferase increased
  • Rectal haemorrhage (bleeding from anus)
  • Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  • Stevens-johnson syndrome (an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity disorder. it ranges from mild skin and mucous membrane lesions to a severe)
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Death
6 - 12 months:
  • Hepatic enzyme increased
  • Febrile neutropenia (fever with reduced white blood cells)
  • Anal cancer
  • Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle)
  • Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death)
  • Death
  • Petechiae (a small red or purple spot caused by bleeding into the skin)
  • Renal failure (kidney dysfunction)
  • Skin ulcer
  • Weight decreased
1 - 2 years:
  • Weight decreased
  • Blood creatine phosphokinase increased
  • Cholestasis (a condition where bile cannot flow from the liver to the duodenum)
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Acute myocardial infarction (acute heart attack)
  • Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis)
  • Drug ineffective
  • Gallbladder disorder
  • Hypoglycaemia (deficiency of glucose in the bloodstream)
  • Oedema (fluid collection in tissue)
2 - 5 years:
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
  • Visual disturbance
  • Alopecia (absence of hair from areas of the body)
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Vesical fistula (a fistulous passage from the urinary bladder)
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Abscess (pus)
5 - 10 years:
  • Agranulocytosis (a deficiency of granulocytes in the blood, causing increased vulnerability to infection)
  • Cholangitis (infection of the bile duct)
  • Diverticular perforation (serious gastrointestinal condition in which the intestine's walls are perforated)
  • Dysphagia (condition in which swallowing is difficult or painful)
  • Pancreatic carcinoma (pancreatic cancer)
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Abnormal dreams
  • Alanine aminotransferase increased
  • Amnesia (deficit in memory caused by brain damage, disease, or psychological trauma)
  • Anaemia haemolytic autoimmune (condition in which the immune system attacks the red blood cells, resulting in fewer of these oxygen-transporting cells)
10+ years:
  • Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
  • Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (isolated low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) with normal bone marrow and the absence of other causes of thrombocytopenia)
  • Venous thrombosis (blood clot (thrombus) that forms within a vein)
  • Cholelithiasis (the presence or formation of gallstones in the gallbladder or bile ducts)
  • Anaemia (lack of blood)
  • Blood cholesterol increased
  • Cardiac disorder
  • Cholecystitis chronic (long lasting infection of gallbladder)
  • Clostridium difficile colitis (inflammation of colon by clostridium difficile bacteria infection)
  • Death
not specified:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Overdose
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Drug toxicity
  • Weight decreased
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Intentional overdose
  • Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)

Most common side effects by gender *:

female:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Drug toxicity
  • Weight decreased
  • Overdose
  • Intentional overdose
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit)
male:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Death
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  • Weight decreased
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Pneumonia
  • Overdose

Most common side effects by age *:

0-1:
  • Overdose
  • Vomiting
  • Accidental overdose
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Transaminases increased
  • Acute hepatic failure
  • Hypothermia (body temperature drops below the required temperature for normal metabolism and body functions)
  • Rash
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis (a rare, life-threatening skin condition that is usually caused by a reaction to drugs causes wide spread skin destruction)
  • Drug toxicity
2-9:
  • Vomiting
  • Overdose
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis (a rare, life-threatening skin condition that is usually caused by a reaction to drugs causes wide spread skin destruction)
  • Abnormal behaviour
  • Urticaria (rash of round, red welts on the skin that itch intensely)
  • Accidental overdose
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • White blood cell count increased
  • Hypothermia (body temperature drops below the required temperature for normal metabolism and body functions)
10-19:
  • Vomiting
  • Intentional overdose
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Overdose
  • Crohn's disease (condition that causes inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract)
  • Suicide attempt
  • Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (adverse drug reactions with rash)
  • Drug toxicity
  • Stevens-johnson syndrome (an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity disorder. it ranges from mild skin and mucous membrane lesions to a severe)
20-29:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Intentional overdose
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Overdose
  • Drug toxicity
  • Multiple drug overdose
  • Suicide attempt
  • Drug abuse
  • Pulmonary embolism (blockage of the main artery of the lung)
30-39:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Drug toxicity
  • Overdose
  • Intentional overdose
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Multiple drug overdose
  • Suicide attempt
  • Drug abuse
40-49:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Drug toxicity
  • Death
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Overdose
  • Weight decreased
  • Multiple drug overdose
  • Intentional overdose
  • Drug abuse
50-59:
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Vomiting
  • Death
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Drug toxicity
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Weight decreased
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Overdose
  • Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
60+:
  • Vomiting
  • Completed suicide (act of taking one's own life)
  • Death
  • Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood)
  • Weight decreased
  • Renal failure acute (rapid kidney dysfunction)
  • Pyrexia (fever)
  • Pneumonia
  • White blood cell count decreased
  • Urinary tract infection

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.

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